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Working Groups

Working Groups are entirely organized and managed by researchers with the aim of sharing common interests. There are no specific formulas for these groups and therefore the structure may vary in many ways concerning participation, reading, guest-speakers, etc. Researchers are encouraged to join and set up working groups. They should not only take advantage of helping to contemplate the fields covered by research seminars but also profit from the possibility of peer-to-peer learning and more open and flexible working conditions than can be provided by seminars.

To set up a new working group, please contact the Departmental Coordinator Anna Coda.

    

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2015-2016, 2016-2017

As cities loom ever larger in the public, political and academic consciousness, the Cities Working Group aims to function as a laboratory from which to rethink the political, the economic, the social, the cultural, and the intellectual through the lens of the urban. With its base amongst historians working with, through or in cities, the working group aims to use a ‘cities perspective’, a multi-scalar sensitivity and a place-driven agenda to generate new questions in our research. We aim to engage with ideas from the social sciences, critical theory, political science, geography, anthropology and other disciplines, and demonstrate their fruitful interaction with historical perspectives. In this context, the working group is designed to facilitate interaction between disciplinary approaches, drawn together by the eclecticism and inclusivity which the dense, complex spatial frame of the urban demands. We meet regularly with a themed session based upon readings, media resources and personal experiences, complemented by presentations delivered by members of the working group. We are also aiming to develop workshops, lectures and events, involving researchers and staff from the EUI, as well as further afield. Finally we hope to situate our thoughts, reflections and research in the city of Firenze, as an urban environment, a social-political entity, and a civic space. Faculty liaison: Jorge Flores, Luca Molà and Stéphane Van Damme Coordinators: Pablo Hernández Sau, Nicholas Mithen, Nazli Songülen

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2014-2015, 2015-2016, 2016-2017

The Economic History Working Group (EHWG) is meant as a platform for discussing current research in economic history and related disciplines carried out at the EUI and beyond. The group organizes student-run seminars and events with external speakers. The EHWG also aims at discussing topics within the discipline that are relevant for current discourse, such as economic development, economic crises, globalization or inequality. The group encourages the participation of students and scholars who wish to present their on-going research to a friendly audience of peers. The EHWG is run by Alexis Drach, Andreas Dugstad, Ioan Balaban, Jelle Bruinsma, Maria Stella Chiaruttini and Simon Amrein. Faculty liaison: Youssef Cassis Coordinators: Maria Stella Chiaruttini and Simon Amrein

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2014-2015, 2015-2016, 2016-2017

This working group lies on the conviction that European integration history can only be truly understood as part of a broader picture. Each session will explore integration from a different point of view, by use of a different theme, concept or analytical tool. The discussions will aim at investigating new research perspectives and at contextualizing European integration history within broader modern European narratives. Interdisciplinary cross-fertilization is meant to be vital for this working group. Faculty liaison: Federico Romero Coordinator: Martin Herzer

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2014-2015, 2015-2016, 2016-2017

The History of Science Working Group has a broad scope, encompassing all aspects of the history of knowledge and science from the early modern period through to the contemporary world. Our discussions focus on the emergence, circulation and uses of knowledge in different places and contexts. We aim to explore traditional and new approaches, critically reviewing them in the light of our own research projects and using them to stimulate discussion on theoretical, methodological and practical issues. We hold informal monthly meetings which function as a “laboratory” to share and try out your work in progress and get feedback from other researchers. We will also be continuing our tradition of the “(Bring your own) Coffee with Historians” series where we will engage with invited scholars throughout the year, including Bruno Latour (Sciences Po, Paris) and Dagmar Schaffer (Max Planck Institut, Berlin). In the past, we have also organised excursions to places in Florence related to the group members interests, such as the Museo Galileo and the Biblioteca Nazionale. We also hope to expand our blog this year to provide researchers with an opportunity to communicate their research. Faculty liaison: Stéphane Van Damme Coordinator: Déborah Dubald

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s):

Since the 1960s the traditional field of imperial history has undergone significant evolution, especially in the wake of wider historiographical developments including the cultural turn and the challenges of post-structuralism. Scholars have delivered significant critiques of the more traditional economic and political/diplomatic perspectives on empire. New ideas about gender and race relations, the relationship between metropole and colony and the dissemination of knowledge have transformed the field. Importantly, Saidian and other theories have problematized imperial historians’ reliance on colonial archives. The Imperial History Working Group brings together researchers working on various manifestations of imperialism and (post-)colonialism in the modern world to engage with these developments and the ways in which they influence our work. Imperial history is often practiced in institutional environments that are regionally, and often nationally, focused. The EUI, on the contrary, brings together scholars of colonialism and imperialism who work on very diverse geographical spaces. The Imperial History Working Group aims to bring into dialogue researchers who are interested in deepening their understanding of imperial history across regional specializations. Faculty liaison: Corinna Unger Coordinators: Kirsten Kamphuis and Ismay Milford

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2014-2015, 2015-2016, 2016-2017

In light of recent developments in intellectual history, that is, the renewed interest in Cambridge contextualism, Begriffsgeschichte, Foucauldian genealogy and the criticisms of these, the intellectual history working group aims to explore the margins and limits of approaches related to the discipline. Besides working on a variety of historical periods and questions, dialogue between different, even contrasting, positions and traditions is promoted. The group meets every two weeks, and the meetings usually consist of an introductory presentation and a general discussion. Please check the webpage of the working group. Faculty liaison: Ann Thomson Coordinators: Annelie Grosse and Nicholas Mithen.

History and Civilization  Law  Political and Social Sciences  

Active since: 2016-2017

After two centuries of formal independence from European imperial powers, Latin America is no longer regarded as a “recipient” of ideas, but as a region generating its own objectives and developing its own path. In the last decades, it has experienced extensive economic growth, and has gone through complex and unique processes of democratization and transitional justice, as well as regional integration. A product of intricate historical realities, Latin America is still challenged by high rates of inequality and poverty, occurrence of State’s and non-State actors’ violence, non-democratic practices, and discrimination based on gender and race. The Latin America Working Group is the forum of reflection on Latin American topics at the European University Institute. It holds seminars and workshops where researchers can discuss their work on an interdisciplinary basis. Through its informal talks and its blog, the working group promotes informed reflection on current Latin American issues. On top of this, the working group is a network of current and former EUI researchers, as well as external researchers, working in connection with Latin America. Faculty liaison: Regina Grafe (HEC) and Philippe Schmitter (SPS). Coordinators: Leiry Cornejo Chavez (LAW), Ileana Nicolau (SPS), Paula Zuluaga (SPS), and Gaël Sánchez Cano (HEC)

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2014-2015, 2016-2017, 2015-2016

The aims of the Mapping History working group are twofold – both theoretical and practical. Firstly, we invite fellow researchers from all fields and working within all periods to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the spatial turn and spatial analysis as well as more theoretical aspects of space/place, and the use of space as a methodological category. Secondly, we are organising practical training sessions to enhance our skills in GIS-software (ArcGIS and QGIS) in co-operation with ICT Service and EUI’s Atelier Multimedia. Faculty liaison: Stéphane Van Damme Coordinator: Mikkel Jensen

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2014-2015, 2015-2016, 2016-2017

The aim of the group is to bring together people who are interested in material culture in various ways and in different historical periods in order to discuss texts, topics, objects and museum exhibitions (to name a few) that interests them. The group also wants to visit places of interest such as museums, to organise visits from relevant scholars, and potentially organise a workshop with external speakers in the beginning of the academic year. The group will meet on a regular basis, about once a month. Faculty liaison: Luca Molà Coordinator: Vibe Maria Martens

History and Civilization  Political and Social Sciences  

Academic Year(s): 2015-2016, 2016-2017

The Nationalism Working Group is an interdisciplinary framework for the discussion of current research projects in the fields of nationalism as well as the most recent developments in the scholarly assessment of the complex problem of nationalism. We intend to cover theoretical and conceptual problems of nationalist movements, sub state nationalism, citizenship, colonialism and anti-colonial movements, diaspora nationalism, nationalist ideology and indifference, and many other fields and problems in past and in present. We encourage the participation of students and scholars who intend to present their research and want to engage in the discussion of this critical concept. The group meets roughly once a month. Faculty liaison: Pieter M. Judson Coordinator: Feike Fliervoet (SPS) and Jan Rybak (HEC)

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2014-2015, 2015-2016, 2016-2017

The Working Group on Social, Cultural and Critical Theory at the EUI aims to be a site for the interdisciplinary examination of the role of theoretical approaches that have emerged over the last decades and their significant impact on the debates in and across the humanities and social sciences. Contemporary critical theory refers to and goes beyond a broad tradition of European thought operating through a set of concepts that has to fulfill explanatory, practical and normative functions. The historical Frankfurt School has developed its own critical and analytical vocabulary, such as ‘the culture industry’ and ‘Ideologiekritik’. Nowadays, the social relevance of this vocabulary is kept alive and its features are common to many critical approaches such as feminism and postcolonialism. However, the application of these concepts within history or social theory not only broadens our theoretical horizon but also reveals considerable struggles with and over the concepts. The commitment of the reading group to a wide range of disciplines, such as history, social theory and cultural theory, aims to encourage the academic community of the EUI to engage with critical concepts and categories continuing one of the most significant intellectual traditions. Such an engagement will create intellectual conditions that will allow us a deeper understanding of the present and the past. In the spirit of fostering an interdisciplinary climate, the working group is open to everyone and will meet regularly (once a month) in order to discuss selected readings. In the future we plan to invite prominent thinkers, opening up the opportunity for us to engage with the expertise of internationally renowned academics. Faculty liaison: Stéphane Van Damme and Pavel Kolář Coordinators: Thuc Linh Nguyen Vu and Waltraud Schuetz

History and Civilization  Political and Social Sciences  

Academic Year(s): 2016-2017

Czesław Miłosz once labeled Russia as “a big void to the East”. The task of our group is to respond to this void by sharing the ideas and expertise across the departments of the EUI. We are interested in everything that we see in geographical, temporal, or ideological proximity to the history of the Soviet Union and politics of post-Soviet Eurasia. From empires to nation-states, from everyday life to power politics, and from Finland to Central Asia to Cuba - we appreciate any comparative studies that put socialist and post-socialist experiences into a broader context. The group is interdepartmental, and scholars from economics, sociology, history and political science are warmly invited. As a part of Soviet and Post-Soviet Working Group we also discuss various Jewish experiences in Europe (predominantly in 19th and 20th centuries). We aim to assess modern Jewish politics in Central/Eastern Europe as well as the impacts imperial and national developments had for the Jewish population of the region. We are especially welcoming comparative and transnational approaches. Coordinator: Maryna Batsman (HEC), Philipp Chapkovskiy (SPS) and Bohdan Shumylovych (HEC) Faculty Liaison: Alexander Etkind

History and Civilization  

Academic Year(s): 2015-2016, 2014-2015, 2016-2017

While often referred to as “the British Isles,” the history of Ireland, Britain, and its various people is both interlinked and diverse. Thus, far from being simply “British,” these Islands, located in the North-Western corner of Europe, encompass various cultural traditions and identities including Gaelic, English, Cornish, Ulster-Scots, Welsh, Scottish, Lallans, Ullans, Unionist, Republican, and monarchist. The history of colonialism and social struggle has also impacted on the demographics of the region, with high levels of migration to, from and within the nations, and established migrant communities in the urban centres such as London, Manchester, Glasgow, Belfast, and Dublin. This Working Group, based at the European University Institute in Florence, encompasses the histories, politics, and cultures of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland as well as the former British colonies and dominions. Its main, but not exclusive, focus is on the social and cultural developments, politics, and conflicts which have divided and united the region, and it aims to interrogate the complexities of its shared, fragmented and conflicted identities through research, discussion and debate. The Working Group organises monthly lectures and informal discussions on historical, contemporary, social, and political topics relevant to the understanding of Ireland, Britain, and its former Empire. Faculty liaison: Lucy Riall Coordinators: Rosa Gilbert and Dieter Reinisch

 

Page last updated on 19 July 2016