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Transforming Innovation Policy for Europe: towards New Theory

Dates:
  • Tue 17 Feb 2015 09.00 - 19.00
  • Wed 18 Feb 2015 09.00 - 15.00
  Add to Calendar 2015-02-17 9:00 2015-02-18 15:00 Europe/Paris Transforming Innovation Policy for Europe: towards New Theory

Background
Through Initiatives such as Horizon 2020, the EU wants innovation to address a number of societal challenges, and it has recently embraced also the notion of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). Nevertheless, many innovation policies take competition between nations and support for R&D as the main entry points for policy making without thinking more creatively. On the other hand, many problems will stay with us when economic growth returns and will likely worsen, leading to intensified climate change, societal turmoil and tensions. They cannot be solved by optimizing current technologies (e.g. burning fossil fuels more efficiently) or by globalizing value chains. Moreover, the modern way of provisioning our basic needs is not sustainable in the long run and the world needs to move away from a costly “business as usual” approach and address these issues head-on by transforming innovation policy.
¦ What policy?
Too often policy seeks to stimulate entrepreneurial activities and solve its negative impacts retroactively through regulation and compensatory measures. This is the social contract of modernity whereby the market is responsible for innovation and economic growth while the state distributes the benefits and manages the risks. We need a new social contract for a second modernity in which we keep our ability to innovate, yet also find new ways of embedding innovations into socially desirable directions from the outset. Innovation policy is our best hope of achieving this if it can do the following two things:
- Stimulate investment throughout the entire innovation chain from invention to innovation and diffusion, far beyond support for R&D and the prioritization of specific research avenues.
- Provide direction to innovation allowing a greater diversity of options, experimenting outside the narrow boundaries set by incumbents and challenging dominant views.

Conference Room, Villa la Fonte DD/MM/YYYY
  Conference Room, Villa la Fonte

Background
Through Initiatives such as Horizon 2020, the EU wants innovation to address a number of societal challenges, and it has recently embraced also the notion of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). Nevertheless, many innovation policies take competition between nations and support for R&D as the main entry points for policy making without thinking more creatively. On the other hand, many problems will stay with us when economic growth returns and will likely worsen, leading to intensified climate change, societal turmoil and tensions. They cannot be solved by optimizing current technologies (e.g. burning fossil fuels more efficiently) or by globalizing value chains. Moreover, the modern way of provisioning our basic needs is not sustainable in the long run and the world needs to move away from a costly “business as usual” approach and address these issues head-on by transforming innovation policy.
¦ What policy?
Too often policy seeks to stimulate entrepreneurial activities and solve its negative impacts retroactively through regulation and compensatory measures. This is the social contract of modernity whereby the market is responsible for innovation and economic growth while the state distributes the benefits and manages the risks. We need a new social contract for a second modernity in which we keep our ability to innovate, yet also find new ways of embedding innovations into socially desirable directions from the outset. Innovation policy is our best hope of achieving this if it can do the following two things:
- Stimulate investment throughout the entire innovation chain from invention to innovation and diffusion, far beyond support for R&D and the prioritization of specific research avenues.
- Provide direction to innovation allowing a greater diversity of options, experimenting outside the narrow boundaries set by incumbents and challenging dominant views.


Location:
Conference Room, Villa la Fonte

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies

Type:
Conference

Contact:
RSCAS Conference Centre - Send a mail

Attachment:
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