« Back to all events

GGP Europe in the World Seminar Series: Divided We Stand: Europe's New Ways of Projecting Power and Influence in 21st Century World Politics

Dates:
  • Thu 11 Jun 2015 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2015-06-11 16:00 2015-06-11 18:00 Europe/Paris GGP Europe in the World Seminar Series: Divided We Stand: Europe's New Ways of Projecting Power and Influence in 21st Century World Politics

The 33 military operations and civilian missions launched by the EU under the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) banner are among the most remarkable features of the EU’s emergent foreign, security, and defense policy. Since embarking on the first mission in 2003, the EU has deployed, on average, some 5,000 troops and personnel around the world each day. But while growing in strategic importance, influence and visibility, EU’s physical engagement in the world often remains sharply contested and politicised. Why do member states engage abroad to such significantly varying degrees, thus creating operations and missions of very different form and scope? Why has the EU been able to launch military operations of several thousand troops with the backing of almost every member state, while at the same time having difficulty in marshalling support for much more modest civilian missions? Why, finally, does the EU abstain from engaging in some similarly important and politically plausible others? This research seminar seeks to answer these novel and essential questions by empirically investigating all EU operations and missions to date as well as a range of “negative cases.” It systematically scrutinises the causes and forces that drive, undermine, or limit Europe’s external engagement. The study contributes to scholarship on the fundamental forces that drive foreign affairs and world politics at large by offering a comprehensive and rigorous analysis of Europe’s bumpy emergence as an international political actor and its evolving strategic interests around the globe.

Seminar Room A, Villa la Fonte DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room A, Villa la Fonte

The 33 military operations and civilian missions launched by the EU under the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) banner are among the most remarkable features of the EU’s emergent foreign, security, and defense policy. Since embarking on the first mission in 2003, the EU has deployed, on average, some 5,000 troops and personnel around the world each day. But while growing in strategic importance, influence and visibility, EU’s physical engagement in the world often remains sharply contested and politicised. Why do member states engage abroad to such significantly varying degrees, thus creating operations and missions of very different form and scope? Why has the EU been able to launch military operations of several thousand troops with the backing of almost every member state, while at the same time having difficulty in marshalling support for much more modest civilian missions? Why, finally, does the EU abstain from engaging in some similarly important and politically plausible others? This research seminar seeks to answer these novel and essential questions by empirically investigating all EU operations and missions to date as well as a range of “negative cases.” It systematically scrutinises the causes and forces that drive, undermine, or limit Europe’s external engagement. The study contributes to scholarship on the fundamental forces that drive foreign affairs and world politics at large by offering a comprehensive and rigorous analysis of Europe’s bumpy emergence as an international political actor and its evolving strategic interests around the globe.


Location:
Seminar Room A, Villa la Fonte

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Seminar

Organiser:
Professor Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS and SPS)
Richard Maher (EUI - RSCAS)

Speaker:
Professor Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS and SPS)
Katerina Wright (EUI - RSCAS)

Contact:
Mia Saugman - Send a mail

Links:
Global Governance Programme
Max Weber Programme
 
 

Similar events

 

Page last updated on 10 November 2016