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Understanding Early Modern Globalisation: The Jesuit Sacred Economy in the Iberian World, ca. 1580 - 1620 / Europe in the World Research Seminar

Dates:
  • Thu 19 Jan 2017 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2017-01-19 16:00 2017-01-19 18:00 Europe/Paris Understanding Early Modern Globalisation: The Jesuit Sacred Economy in the Iberian World, ca. 1580 - 1620 / Europe in the World Research Seminar

In this presentation, Greenwood contends that early modern globalisation, at least in its Iberian manifestation, was more than an economic-cum-political phenomenon. In Spain, Portugal, and their dominions, which encompassed much of the known world, globalisation emanated from Catholic religious culture. To this end, Greenwood examines the ‘sacred economy’ of the Society of Jesus, also known as the Jesuits, one of the first religious orders to have established a global presence. This ‘sacred economy’ consisted of overlapping transoceanic networks marshalled by the Jesuits to circulate information and goods, which consisted of material objects as well as reporting supernatural occurrences. Examining this movement of ideas, people, and commodities 500 years ago helps us to understand the mechanisms of what became globalisation in the twenty-first century.

Sala Europa, Villa Schifanoia DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala Europa, Villa Schifanoia

In this presentation, Greenwood contends that early modern globalisation, at least in its Iberian manifestation, was more than an economic-cum-political phenomenon. In Spain, Portugal, and their dominions, which encompassed much of the known world, globalisation emanated from Catholic religious culture. To this end, Greenwood examines the ‘sacred economy’ of the Society of Jesus, also known as the Jesuits, one of the first religious orders to have established a global presence. This ‘sacred economy’ consisted of overlapping transoceanic networks marshalled by the Jesuits to circulate information and goods, which consisted of material objects as well as reporting supernatural occurrences. Examining this movement of ideas, people, and commodities 500 years ago helps us to understand the mechanisms of what became globalisation in the twenty-first century.


Location:
Sala Europa, Villa Schifanoia

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies
Department of History and Civilization
Max Weber Programme

Type:
Research seminar

Organiser:
Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)
Professor Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS and SPS)
Richard Maher (EUI - RSCAS)

Contact:
Mia Saugman - Send a mail

Discussant:
Akisato Suzuki ( EUI - Max Weber Fellow)

Speaker:
Jonathan Greenwood (EUI - Max Weber Fellow)

Links:
Global Governance Programme
EUI Data Protection Policy
 
 

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