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Citizens, Leaders and War / Europe in the World Research Seminar

Dates:
  • Thu 27 Apr 2017 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2017-04-27 16:00 2017-04-27 18:00 Europe/Paris Citizens, Leaders and War / Europe in the World Research Seminar

Interstate war has been a central puzzle for rationalist explanations, since it is more efficient to achieve an objective without war than with war as long as the war consumes some resource. The most recent rationalist explanation argues that war can be a rational choice for leaders if not for the whole society, when they expect to benefit from war, such as extending tenure, accumulating personal wealth, or satisfying their political beliefs. The remaining puzzle is why citizens let the leader initiate war if they must bear the cost. Suzuki identifies two explanations, reflecting two contrasting human traits to produce specific group-level outcomes: collectivity vs. individuality. From the perspective of collectivity, we can theorise that if people follow nationalism, they believe war is necessary for their own nation’s security from external threats and individuals must bear its cost, thereby supporting the leader’s war effort. Meanwhile, from the perspective of individuality, we can infer that if citizens expect that the cost to individuals opposing war is higher than that of war itself, they will rationally let the leader initiate war. Quantitative analysis of time-series cross-country data from 1950-2007 provided support for the latter proposition.

Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Interstate war has been a central puzzle for rationalist explanations, since it is more efficient to achieve an objective without war than with war as long as the war consumes some resource. The most recent rationalist explanation argues that war can be a rational choice for leaders if not for the whole society, when they expect to benefit from war, such as extending tenure, accumulating personal wealth, or satisfying their political beliefs. The remaining puzzle is why citizens let the leader initiate war if they must bear the cost. Suzuki identifies two explanations, reflecting two contrasting human traits to produce specific group-level outcomes: collectivity vs. individuality. From the perspective of collectivity, we can theorise that if people follow nationalism, they believe war is necessary for their own nation’s security from external threats and individuals must bear its cost, thereby supporting the leader’s war effort. Meanwhile, from the perspective of individuality, we can infer that if citizens expect that the cost to individuals opposing war is higher than that of war itself, they will rationally let the leader initiate war. Quantitative analysis of time-series cross-country data from 1950-2007 provided support for the latter proposition.


Location:
Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies
Department of Political and Social Sciences
Department of History and Civilization
Max Weber Programme

Type:
Research seminar

Organiser:
Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)
Professor Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS and SPS)
Richard Maher (EUI - RSCAS)

Contact:
Mia Saugman - Send a mail

Speaker:
Akisato Suzuki ( EUI - Max Weber Fellow)

Discussant:
Stefano Marcuzzi (EUI - Max Weber Fellow)

Links:
Global Governance Programme
EUI Data Protection Policy
 
 
 

Page last updated on 10 November 2016