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Rethinking Dictatorship: Latin Europe in the Interwar Period

Dates:
  • Thu 23 Mar 2017 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2017-03-23 15:00 2017-03-23 17:00 Europe/Paris Rethinking Dictatorship: Latin Europe in the Interwar Period

In the 1920s, the decade of pacifism and internationalism, three authoritarian regimes reached power in Southern Europe. In 1922, the March on Rome brought Fascists to government in Italy. The year after, General Miguel Primo de Rivera installed a dictatorship in Spain and, in 1926, a military coup put an end to the First Republic in Portugal.
A number of historians have recently emphasised that the emergence of dictatorships was typical rather than exceptional in interwar European history, adding an important counterweight to work on the League of Nations that tends to exaggerate the role of liberal internationalism in this period. Furthermore, recent works have shown that shifting the focus away from Nazi Germany and from hard-power politics provides historians with a very different narrative of interwar Europe.
The aim of this workshop is to assess the place of the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese dictatorships in European history, as well as discuss the significance of culture, propaganda, and soft power in the historical narratives of authoritarianism and imperialism. More specifically, we seek to consider the existence and significance of a specific kind of ‘Latin Mediterranean’ European’ dictatorship in the interwar period. The workshop will thus intervene decisively in current debates on interwar European history and propose an alternative reading of European politics in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s.

Should you wish to have access to the workshop’s suggested readings, please register by writing to: benjamin.whitlock@eui.eu

Sala del Camino, Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Camino, Villa Salviati

In the 1920s, the decade of pacifism and internationalism, three authoritarian regimes reached power in Southern Europe. In 1922, the March on Rome brought Fascists to government in Italy. The year after, General Miguel Primo de Rivera installed a dictatorship in Spain and, in 1926, a military coup put an end to the First Republic in Portugal.
A number of historians have recently emphasised that the emergence of dictatorships was typical rather than exceptional in interwar European history, adding an important counterweight to work on the League of Nations that tends to exaggerate the role of liberal internationalism in this period. Furthermore, recent works have shown that shifting the focus away from Nazi Germany and from hard-power politics provides historians with a very different narrative of interwar Europe.
The aim of this workshop is to assess the place of the Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese dictatorships in European history, as well as discuss the significance of culture, propaganda, and soft power in the historical narratives of authoritarianism and imperialism. More specifically, we seek to consider the existence and significance of a specific kind of ‘Latin Mediterranean’ European’ dictatorship in the interwar period. The workshop will thus intervene decisively in current debates on interwar European history and propose an alternative reading of European politics in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s.

Should you wish to have access to the workshop’s suggested readings, please register by writing to: benjamin.whitlock@eui.eu


Location:
Sala del Camino, Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Workshop

Organiser:
Lucy Riall (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
Dr. Christian Goeschel (The University of Manchester)
Gaël Sánchez Cano (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Contact:
Ben Whitlock - Send a mail

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