Centre for Media Pluralism and Media Freedom (CMPF) > Academic Seminars > Media pluralism lessons from down under: Australia as a case-study of poor media policy-making leading to media ownership concentration

Media pluralism lessons from down under: Australia as a case-study of poor media policy-making leading to media ownership concentration

Australian-media-stripe

 

Monday 13 October 2014 
14-16 pm  Sala Capitolo EUI - Badia Fiesolana

CMPF Academic Seminar  by Sally Young


This seminar focuses on a paradox. Australia is a mature and stable democracy, remarkably free of corruption, with a high degree of civil liberties, high economic prosperity, high political participation and is ranked second in the world for living conditions. So why does Australia have some of the most concentrated media ownership in the Western world including the most concentrated press ownership among established democracies? How did media policy failures lead to a situation where only three major newspaper owners own every daily newspaper in Australia and where just one company - Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation Australia - controls over 70% of newspaper circulation? News Corporation also dominates the monopoly pay television provider in Australia and Rupert’s son, Lachlan, has a large stake in one of Australia’s three commercial free-to-air TV networks. Historically and recently, News Corporation has been accused of using its power to influence the conduct of Australian politics and even the composition of its governments. For an international audience, Australia is a case-study of what can go wrong in media policy-making and why media ownership concentration – including in the newspaper industry - still matters despite the rise of the internet and online news outlets.

 

Sally-Young Sally Young is an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow, and Associate Professor and Reader in Political Science at the University of Melbourne. Her ARC fellowship provides four years of funding for Sally to research press power and media policy-making. She has published widely in the areas of Australian politics, Australian media, political communication and journalism studies including three books and over forty journal articles and conference papers. Her most recent book is How Australia Decides: Election Reporting and the Media (Cambridge University Press, 2011). Sally is also a newspaper columnist who writes a monthly column on Australian politics and media for the Age newspaper.

 

 


For further information and to register for the event please write to: cmpf@eui.eu

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