Home » Departments and Centres » History and Civilization » Research & Teaching » Seminars » 2017-2018 1st term » Core Introductory Seminar

Core Introductory Seminar

Departmental Seminar

Group A: Prof Luca Molà
Registration code: HEC-DS-CISA-17
Thursdays, 11:00 - 12:50, Sala del Camino

Group B: Prof Youssef Cassis
Registration code: HEC-DS-CISB-17
Thursdays, 11:00-  12:50, Sala dei Levrieri

Starts on 19 October 2017
Admin. Assistant: Miriam Curci

 

Seminar description


The Core introductory seminar is designed to introduce first year doctoral researchers to fundamental elements of historical method while integrating them into the intellectual culture of our department. The distinctiveness of this culture lies above all in our shared commitment to the comparative, transnational and global history of Europe in the world. This common commitment is expressed and realized in very diverse ways in the research pursued by the faculty researchers with whom you will be working over the next four years. 

Equally important, the seminar also aims to promote a common culture of discussion and intellectual engagement among researchers who, like the EUI faculty, come from very different academic cultures. Only through dialogue and exchange can we begin to understand the concepts that underlie our particular languages of scholarship and think in rich and comparative/transnational ways about how these different research traditions can engage each other.

With these goals in mind, the seminar opens with a series of five sessions intended to introduce researchers to the Department, its fields of research and diverse approaches through concrete discussion of ongoing faculty research. The second part of the course focuses more closely on the multiple and varied sources of historical scholarship as well as their critical reading and deployment in service of a larger historical argument. By reading a small selection of exemplary texts that use a wide range of source materials, we will analyze together the manifold ways in which different kinds of archives, ego documents, oral interviews, visual evidence and material objects (to name but a few types of sources) have been deployed in historical scholarship. This, in turn, should nourish researchers’ thoughts about their own projects, and how they might develop and refine their research questions in dialogue with the sources.  

 

 

Syllabus


19 October: Joint introductory session (Sala del Camino)

26 October: Professors’ presentations

Prof. Regina Grafe (11:00-12:00 Group B – 12:00-13:00 Group A): “Of Nuns, cash, and credit. A non-eurocentric history of Spanish America’s fiscal and financial history in the 18th century”

Reading:

  • Regina Grafe (forthcoming), "An Empire without debt? The Spanish Empire and its colonial realm"

Prof. Lucy Riall (11:00-12:00 Group A – 12:00-13:00 Group B): "Biography and global microhistory"

Readings:

  • Lucy Riall (2014) "Travel, migration, exile: Garibaldi's global fame". Modern Italy, 19:1, pp. 41-52.
  • Geroge F. W. Young (1974) The Germans in Chile: Immigration and Colonization, 1849-1914, Ch. 2 “The  German National Colony Idea”, pp. 45-67, The Center for Migration Studies of New York. 

8 November: Professors’ presentations
N.B. change of room for Group B: Sala del Torrino (instead of Sala dei Levrieri)

Prof. Ann Thomson (11:00-12:00 Group A – 12:00-13:00 Group B): “Global Intellectual History”

Readings:

  • Ann Thomson (2017) "Colonialism, race and slavery in Raynal’s Histoire des deux Indes". Global Intellectual History, 1-17.
  • Samuel Moyn and Andrew Sartori (2013) "Approaches to Global Intellectual History". Columbia University Press.

Prof. Stéphane Van Damme (11:00-12:00 Group B – 12:00-13:00 Group A): "From Comparative to Global History of Science"

Readings:

  • Lissa Roberts (2009) "Situating Science in Global History: Local Exchanges and Networks of Circulation". Itinerario, 33(1), 9-30.
  • Stéphane Van Damme (2016) "Researching European Sciences: new stakes & new challenges". Viewpoint No. 110. 

9 November: Professors’ presentations

Prof. Federico Romero (11:00-12:00 Group A – 12:00-13:00 Group B): “East-West antagonism and cooperation in Cold War Europe”

Readings:

  • Federico Romero (2014) "Cold War historiography at the crossroads", Cold War History , 14:4, 685-703.
  • Angela Romano & Federico Romero (2014) "European Socialist regimes facing globalisation and European co-operation: dilemmas and responses – introduction", Journal European Review of History: Revue européenne d'histoire , 21:2, 157-164.
  • Federico Romero (2014) "Refashioning the West to dispel its fears: the early G7 summits"; in Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol and Federico Romero (eds), International summitry and global governance : the rise of the G7 and the European Council, London: Routledge, 2014, Cold War History, pp. 117-137.

Prof. Corinna Unger (11:00-12:00 Group B – 12:00-13:00 Group A): “The World Bank and Urban Development in Calcutta, 1970s and 1980s”

Reading: 

  • Corinna R. Unger (2017), “Development Projections: The World Bank and the Modernization of Calcutta, 1970s and 1980s”. Manuscript under review.

16 November: Professors’ presentations  

Prof. Pieter Judson (11:00-12:00 Group B – 12:00-13:00 Group A): "Theorising National Indifference"

Readings:

  • Rogers Brubaker (2004) "Ethnicity without Groups". Harvard University Press, Cambridge. Chapter 1.
  • Pieter M. Judson (2016) "Nationalism and Indifference". In von Johannes Feichtinger and Heidemarie Uhl (eds.). Habsburg neu denken: Vielfalt und Ambivalenz in Zentraleuropa. 30 kulturwissenschaftliche Stichworte.Boehlau Verlag, pp. 149-155.

Prof. Youssef Cassis (11:00-12:00 Group A – 12:00-13:00 Group B): What can we learn from the history of financial crises

Reading: 

  • Youssef Cassis (2017) "Regulatory responses to the financial crises of the Great Depression: Britain, France and the United States". In Edward J. Balleisen, Lori S. Bennear, Kimberly D. Krawiec, Jonathan B. Wiener (eds.). Policy Shock: Recalibrating Risk and Regulation after Oil Spills, Nuclear Accidents and Financial Crises. Cambridge University Press. 

23 November: Professors’ presentations

Prof. Luca Molà (11:00-12:00 Group B): “Reinventing Renaissance Modernity: The Development of Intellectual Property Rights in Italy and Europe, XVth-XVIIth Centuries”

Readings:

  • Luca Molà (2014) "Inventors, patent and the market for innovations in renaissance Italy"; in Ian Inkster (ed.), History of technology, London ; New York : Bloomsbury academic, History of technology; 32, pp. 7-34.
  • Luca Molà (2007) "States and Crafts: Relocating Technical Skills in Renaissance Italy’, in Evelyn Welch and Michelle O’Malley (eds.), The Material Renaissance, Manchester University Press.

 Prof. Luca Molà (12:00-13:00 Group A): "Venice and Asia: The Circulation of Goods, People and Technologies"

Readings:

  • Marta Ajmar-Wollheim and Luca Molà (2011), "The Global Renaissance: Cross-Cultural Objects in the Early Modern Period", in Glenn Adamson, Giorgio Riello and Sarah Teasley, Global Design History, Routledge.
  • Luca Molà (forthcoming) “A Silken Diplomacy. Venetian Luxury Gifts for the Ottoman Empire in the Late Renaissance.” In Giorgio Riello, Anne Gerritson and Zoltán Biedermann (eds.), Global Gifts: The Material Culture of Diplomacy in Early Modern Eurasia, Cambridge University Press. 

Prof. Alexander Etkind (11:00-12:00 Group A – 12:00-13:00 Group B): "Kant’s Subaltern Period: The Birth of Cosmopolitanism from the Spirit of Occupation"

Reading: 

  • Alexander Etkind (2017) "Kant’s Subaltern Period: The Birth of Cosmopolitanism from the Spirit of Occupation"; in Dina Guseinova (ed.), Cosmopolitanism in Conflict. Imperial Encounters from the Seven Years War to the Cold War, Palgrave.

30 November: Sources (Early Modern History in Group A, Modern History Group B)

Readings for Group A: 

  • Thomas V. Cohen (2004), Love and Death in Renaissance Italy, University of Chicago Press, pp. 45-70.
  • Sven Dupré (2010), 'Trading Luxury Glass, Picturing Collections and Consuming Objects of Knowledge in Early Seventeenth-Century Antwerp', Intellectual History Review, 20, pp. 53-78.
  • Robert Darnton (1999), The Great Cat Massacre and Other Episodes in French Cultural History, Basic Books, pp. 75-104.
  • Luca Molà (forthcoming), 'Marco Polo and Trade with the Orient: A Traveler's Inventory'. (optional)

Readings for Group B: 

  • Peter Hayes, Industry and Ideology. IG Farben in the Nazi Era (Cambridge University Press, 1987), Ch. 3, pp.81-124
  • David S. Landes, Bankers and Pashas. International Finance and Economic Imperialism in Egypt (Harvard University Press, 1958), Ch. 4, pp.102-127, and bibliographical note, pp. 341-344

7 December: Sources (swap groups)

Readings for Group A: 

  • Peter Hayes, Industry and Ideology. IG Farben in the Nazi Era (Cambridge University Press, 1987), Ch. 3, pp.81-124
  • David S. Landes, Bankers and Pashas. International Finance and Economic Imperialism in Egypt (Harvard University Press, 1958), Ch. 4, pp.102-127, and bibliographical note, pp. 341-344

Readings for Group B: 

  • Thomas V. Cohen (2004), Love and Death in Renaissance Italy, University of Chicago Press, pp. 45-70.
  • Sven Dupré (2010), 'Trading Luxury Glass, Picturing Collections and Consuming Objects of Knowledge in Early Seventeenth-Century Antwerp', Intellectual History Review, 20, pp. 53-78.
  • Robert Darnton (1999), The Great Cat Massacre and Other Episodes in French Cultural History, Basic Books, pp. 75-104.
  • Luca Molà (forthcoming), 'Marco Polo and Trade with the Orient: A Traveler's Inventory'. (optional)

14 December: Joint concluding session (Sala del Consiglio)

 

Page last updated on 24 November 2017