Decolonization and Development

Research Seminar

Organised by Prof. Corinna Unger
Thursdays, 9:00-10:50, Sala Belvedere  
Admin. Assistant: Miriam Curci
Starts on 14 January 2016

 

Seminar description


This seminar focuses on the intersection of the history of colonialism, decolonization, and postcolonial politics over the course of the twentieth century. It studies the activities and demands of anti-colonial movements; the processes and patterns of decolonization; the efforts of the new nations to secure independence and promote socioeconomic development against the background of the Cold War and regional conflicts; and the emergence of an international development aid regime. Particular attention is paid to the role of knowledge and expertise in the transition from the colonial to the postcolonial period and in the formulation of development approaches. The seminar makes an effort to include a variety of perspectives, ranging from those views represented in the former colonies to those associated with the former colonial powers to those of international observers and commentators.

Syllabus


14 January: Introduction

  • John Darwin, “Decolonization and the End of Empire,” in The Oxford History of the British Empire, vol. 5: Historiography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001), 541-558.
  • Martin Shipway, “Introduction: Decolonization in Comparative Perspective,” in idem, Decolonization and Its Impact: A Comparative Approach to the End of the Colonial Empires (Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2008), 1-16.
  • Caroline Elkins, “Looking Beyond Mau Mau: Archiving Violence in the Era of Decolonization,” American Historical Review 120.3 (2015): 852-868.

 

21 January: The Entangled Origins of Decolonization and Development

  • Martin Shipway, “Colonial Politics Before the Flood: Challenging the State, Imagining the Nation,” in idem, Decolonization and Its Impact: A Comparative Approach to the End of the Colonial Empires (Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2008), 35-60.
  • Frederick Cooper, “Development, Modernization, and the Social Sciences in the Era of Decolonization: The Examples of British and French Africa,” in Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo and António Costa Pinta, eds., The Ends of European Colonial Empires: Cases and Comparisons (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), 15-50.
  • Julia Tischler, “Cementing Uneven Development: The Central African Federation and the Kariba Dam Scheme,” Journal of Southern African Studies 40.5 (2014): 1047-1064.

 

28 January: The Process of Decolonization

  • Martin Shipway, “The Late Colonial State at War: Insurgency, Emergency and Terror,” in idem, Decolonization and Its Impact: A Comparative Approach to the End of the Colonial Empires (Malden, Mass.: Blackwell, 2008), 140-172.
  • William Roger Louis and Ronald Robinson, “The Imperialism of Decolonization,” in James D. Le Sueur, ed., The Decolonization Reader (New York: Routledge, 2003), 49-79.
  • Stein Tønnesson, “National Divisions in Indochina’s Decolonization,” in Prasenjit Duara, ed., Decolonization: Perspectives from now and then (London: Routledge, 2004), 253-277.

  

4 February: Agents of Decolonization

  • Charles Ambler, “Alcohol, Racial Segregation and Popular Politics in Northern Rhodesia,” in James D. Le Sueur, ed., The Decolonization Reader (New York: Routledge, 2003), 341-357.
  • Andreas Eckert, “Julius Nyerere, Tanzanian Elites, and the Project of African Socialism,” in Marc Frey and Jost Dülffer, eds., Elites and Decolonization in the Twentieth Century (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 216-240.
  • Giuliano Garavini, “Completing Decolonization: The 1973 ‘Oil Shock’ and the Struggle for Economic Rights,” The International History Review 33.3 (2011): 473-487.

 

11 February: The Role of Rights in the Process of Decolonization

  • Ronald Burke, Decolonization and the Evolution of International Human Rights (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010), 1-12 and 35-58.
  • Jérôme B. Elie and Jussi Hanhimäki, “UNHCR and Decolonization in Africa: Expansion and Emancipation, 1950s to 1970s,” in Anja Kruke, ed., Dekolonisation: Prozesse und Verflechtungen, 1945-1990 (Bonn: Dietz, 2009), 53-72.

 

18 February: International Organizations in Decolonization and Development

  • Margherita Zanasi, “Exporting Development: The League of Nations and Republican China,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 49.1 (2007): 143-169.
  • Susan Pedersen, “Getting Out of Iraq – in 1932: The League of Nations and the Road to Normative Statehood,” American Historical Review 115.4 (2010): 975-1000.
  • Christopher O’Sullivan, “The United Nations, Decolonization, and Self-Determination in Cold War Sub-Saharan Africa, 1960-1964,” Journal of Third World Studies 22.2 (2005): 105-120.

 

25 February: Determined Development? Health, Population, and the Environment

  • Sunil Amrith, “Health and Sovereignty in the New Asia: Visions of Development,” Comparativ 19.4 (2009): 78-95.
  • Maria Dörnemann, “Seeing Population as a Problem: Influences of the Construction of Population Knowledge on Kenyan Politics (1940s to 1980s),” in A World of Populations: Transnational Perspectives on Demography in the Twentieth Century, ed. Heinrich Hartmann and Corinna R. Unger (New York: Berghahn Books, 2014), 201-221.
  • Thomas Robertson, “Cold War Landscapes: Toward an Environmental History of U.S. Development Programs in the 1950s and 1960s,” Cold War History (2015), online edition.

 

10 March: Development Transfers and Transformations

  • Abou B. Bamba, “Triangulating a Modernization Experiment: The United States, France, and the Making of the Kossou Project in Central Ivory Coast,” Journal of Modern European History 8.1 (2010): 66-83.
  • Michael Mahoney, “Estado Novo, Homem Novo (New State, New Man): Colonial and Anti-Colonial Development Ideologies in Mozambique, 1930-1977,” in David C. Engerman et al., eds., Staging Growth: Modernization, Development, and the Global Cold War (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2003), 165-197.
  • Martin Rempe, “Decolonization by Europeanization? The Early EEC and the Transformation of French-African Relations,” The Transformative Power of Europe, Working Paper 27 (2011).

 

17 March: Expert Knowledge in Development and Decolonization

  • Donna C. Mehos and Suzanne M. Moon, “The Uses of Portability: Circulating Experts in the Technopolitics of Cold War and Decolonization,” in Gabrielle Hecht, ed., Entangled Geographies: Empire and Technopolitics in the Global Cold War (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2011), 43-74.
  • Corinne A. Pernet, “Between Entanglements and Dependencies: Food, Nutrition, and National Development at the Central American Institute of Nutrition (INCAP),” in International Organizations and Development, 1945-1990, ed. Marc Frey, Sönke Kunkel, and Corinna R. Unger (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), 101-125.
  • Sarah Stockwell, “Exporting Britishness: Decolonization in Africa, the British State and Its Clients,” in Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo and António Costa Pinta, eds., The Ends of European Colonial Empires: Cases and Comparisons (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), 148-177.

 

23 March: Writing about Decolonization and Development

  • Barbara Weinstein, “Developing Inequality,” American Historical Review 113.1 (2008): 1-18.
  • Dane Kennedy, “Imperial History and Post-Colonial Theory,” in James D. Le Sueur, ed., The Decolonization Reader (New York: Routledge, 2003), 10-22.

 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017

Back to top