EUDO Data Centre

The European Democracy Observatory (EUDO), part of the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies and organized on the basis of Observatories, has been the forefront of research on the EU between 2006 and 2016. This website is no longer active, and serves the sole purpose of an online archive of past activities.

In January 2017 EUDO Citizenship, one of the Observatories, became the Global Citizenship Observatory (GLOBALCIT), affiliated with the  Global Governance Programme. Please visit the new  GLOBALCIT website

In January 2018 the RSC launched the European Governance and Politics Programme (EGPP), the successor of EUDO. Please visit the new  EGPP website.
 

The EUDO Data Centre has provided centralised, interactive access to datasets produced by the EUDO until 2016, with more than 300,000 dataset downloads and interactive analyses, performed by thousands of users worldwide.

This pioneering data is now available via the EUI ResData repository.  As a result, these datasets that were historically available at the EUDO Data Centre are now officially available through the EUI ResData repository:


  • EUANDI Dataset

    The euandi dataset is composed of two parts: a coded record of the political position of parties in the 2014 European Parliamentary elections, and data from a general survey of user profiles in the 2014 European Parliamentary elections.

    (1) Coded record of the political position of parties in the 2014 European Parliamentary elections: Political parties were asked to position themselves with regard to 30 statements on:

    (a) Welfare, family and health;
    (b) Migration and immigration;
    (c) Society, religion and culture;
    (d) Finances and taxes;
    (e) Economy and work;
    (f) Environment, transport and energy;
    (g) Law and order;
    (h) Foreign policy;
    (i) European integration;
    (j) Country specific items. Additionally coded was: country name, party name, and party abbreviation.

    (2) Data from a general survey of user profiles in the 2014 European Parliamentary elections: Users' position on political issues were surveyed:

    (a) Welfare, family and health;
    (b) Migration and immigration;
    (c) Society, religion and culture;
    (d) Finances and taxes;
    (e) Economy and work;
    (f) Environment, transport and energy;
    (g) Law and order;
    (h) Foreign policy;
    (i) European integration;
    (j) Country specific items. Basic socio-demographic information: age, gender, education level. Additionally coded: user-ID; day and time when user started and finished answering the questionnaire; user's geo-localisation based on IP address (NUTS-0-level); user's geo-localisation based on IP address (NUTS-3-level); version of the country questionnaire chosen by the user; perceived saliency of each issue; matching-score with the positions of the political parties; user's propensity to vote for a given party in his country of choice; position of the user on a socio-economic policy-dimension (socio-economic left to socio-economic right); position of the user on a European policy dimension (anti-EU-integration to pro-EU-integration); position of the user on libertarian and authoritarian policy dimension (liberal values to traditional values).

  • ELECLAW indicators: Measuring Voting and Candidacy Rights of Resident Citizens, Non Resident Citizens and Non-Citizen Residents

    Electoral laws determine membership in the demos, that is, in the set of people who can participate in elections and referenda via voting and candidacy rights. As such, they are of crucial importance for democratic inclusion and electoral democracy.

    Based on information of the qualitative database on electoral rights, the ELECLAW indicators measure the degree of inclusion of voting rights (VOTLAW) and candidacy rights (CANLAW) for three different categories of potential voters: resident citizens (RC), non-resident citizens (NR), and non-citizen residents (NC).

    Last Released: Mar 23, 2017

  • EU-Profiler: user profiles in the 2009 European Elections

    The EU Profiler is a Voting Advice Application (VAA) running during the European Elections of 2009. Respondents are situated in a political spectrum, according to their positioning with regard to 30 statements on:

    (a) Welfare, family and health;
    (b) Migration and immigration;
    (c) Society, religion and culture;
    (d) Finances and taxes;
    (e) Economy and work;
    (f) Environment, transport and energy;
    (g) Law and order;
    (h)Foreign policy;
    (i) European integration;
    (j) Country specific items: 2 additional items specific to each country.

    Respondents' situation is compared to the situation of all parties competing in the 2009 European Elections. An additional questionnaire asks about: the utility of the VAA, economic situation, political confidence, propensity to vote, attitudes towards democracy, and other political attitudes.

    Last Released: Jun 23, 2011

  • EU-Profiler: positioning of the parties in the European Elections

    The EU Profiler is a Voting Advice Application (VAA) running during the European Elections of 2009. It situates the parties competing in these elections (and includes parties from three non-EU-Member-States) in a political spectrum, according to their positioning with regard to 30 statements on:

    (a) Welfare, family and health;
    (b) Migration and immigration;
    (c) Society, religion and culture;
    (d) Finances and taxes;
    (e) Economy and work;
    (f) Environment, transport and energy;
    (g) Law and order;
    (h)Foreign policy;
    (i) European integration;
    (j) Country specific items: 2 additional items specific to each country.

    Coding of the parties has been done by experts on the basis of the official documentation of the parties (manifestos, platforms, etc.), media coverage and others. Parties have been given the opportunity to situate themselves on these 30 statements.

    Last Released: Nov 18, 2010

  • Replication data for: Katz-Mair (1992) Party Organisational Data

    Katz-Mair Party Organisational Data are the data-set in the form of Excel and PDF files from the volume Party Organisations: A Data Handbook on Party Organisations in Western Democracies, 1960-90, edited by Richard S Katz and Peter Mair, and originally published by Sage (London) in 1992.

    The data cover various aspects of party organisational development from the 1960s through to the end of the 1980s, including for each party in each country (and for the European Community party federations, where relevant) the membership levels; the qualifications, obligations, and rights of membership; the number of basic units or branches; number of paid employees; the organisation of the national executive and national congress; the membership and function of these bodies; rules about candidate selection and gender representation; party finance, including sources of income and target of expenditure, as well as the rules regarding public subventions to parties.

    The data are reproduced here on a non-exclusive basis as a still relevant resource for comparative party research, and as a way of encouraging scholars in the field to contribute to the eventual extension and updating of the figures. The countries included in the original data set, with the original authors of the data collection and analysis also indicated, are:

    - Austria (Wolfgang C. Muller);
    - Belgium (Kris Deschouwer);
    - Denmark (Lars Bille);
    - Finland (Jan Sundberg and Christel Gyllig);
    - Germany (Thomas Poguntke and Bernhard Boll);
    - Ireland (David M. Farrell);
    - Italy (Luciano Bardi and Leonardo Morlino);
    - Netherlands (Ruud Koole and Hella van der Velde);
    - Norway (Lars Svǻsand);
    - Sweden (Jon Pierre and Anders Widfeldt);
    - United Kingdom (Paul D. Webb).

    At a later stage we also hope to add the data for the United States (Robin Kolodny and Richard S. Katz) and for the Transnational Federations in the European Community (Luciano Bardi), both cases having been included in the original volume.

    OPPR and EUDO are grateful to Ken Janda for his work in preparing these data in this format.

    Last Released: Nov 12, 2010

Page last updated on 02 November 2020

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