Teaching Exchange at LSE 2010

The Teaching Exchange at LSE in London will take place 8-12 March 2010.
Programme

Below follows an overview of the lectures, including a brief abstract, that the Max Weber Fellows will give at LSE:

 

Baics

Gergely Baics (History)

Provisioning an Atlantic Metropolis: New York City, 1780-1860 

Date: Monday 8 March 2010 
Time: 6-7pm 
Venue: Room 2.06, New Academic Building

Abstract: 
Cities, beyond a certain scale, cannot feed themselves. My lecture will outline New York City’s transition from a tightly regulated public market system to a free-market system of food provisioning in the second quarter of the 19th century. In particular, I will address the social consequences of deregulation in the context of rapid urban growth. How did free-market reforms affect the spatial relations of household provisioning, the standard of living of residents, and the underlying structures of social inequality?

 

 

Fioriglio

Gianluigi Fioriglio (Law) 

Health privacy in the Internet age. Risks and opportunities

Date: Thursday 11 March 2010 
Time: 6-7pm 
Venue: Room 2.08, New Academic Building 

Abstract:
Personal health information is hard to protect, especially on line. The information flow is constantly growing in the health sector, where electronic records can be made available not only to health care professionals and institutions, but also to patients. How is it possible to strike a balance between confidentiality and sharing? How can fundamental rights such as privacy and health be protected? The lecture examines the risks and opportunities related to the electronic processing of health information, taking into account the main legal issues. 

 

 

Hering

Laura Hering (ECO)

Economic geography and spatial income inequality

Date: Monday 8 March 2010 
Time: 7-8pm 
Venue: Room 2.06, New Academic Building 

Abstract:
This lecture wants to give a brief introduction into the basic concepts and recent empirical evidence on the role of economic geography in the formation of spatial inequalities. Economic geography shows how the presence of trade costs leads to the agglomeration of economic activity in certain locations and to income disparities between locations. The focus of this lecture lies on explaining spatial inequalities in income and migration patterns within countries. The empirical evidence presented comes mainly from China and Brazil and shows the consequences for the spatial structure of the opening to foreign trade and the regional integration within these countries.

 

 

Lu

Yang Lu (ECO)

Government Accountability and Policy

Date: Tuesday 9 March 2010 
Time: 6-7pm 
Venue: Room 1.14, New Academic Building 

Abstract:
Government accountability for its policy planning is essential for good policy outcomes. How, then, should a government design its policy while recognizing public scepticism over whether its current plans will in fact be executed? What is the best way for a government to use its current policy to actively build up its credibility? And how can a government with a high level of credibility take the best advantage of it during times of turmoil? This lecture will address these questions using an economic model.

 

 

Miralles

Antonio Miralles (ECO)

School Choice: Assigning fairly and efficiently

Date: Tuesday 9 March 2010 
Time: 7-8pm 
Venue: Room 1.14, New Academic Building 

Abstract:
Money is not involved in all relevant allocation problems economists study. A paradigmatic example where money is not used is the assignment of children to schools, commonly known as School Choice program. The way and the extent to which parents are given choice among schools has to be carefully planned. If efficiency is primed, there is a risk that nonstrategic parents take wrong decisions affecting their children's future. If fairness in the sense of protection to nonstrategic parents is the main criterion, there is risk that the assignment mechanisms does not generate enough incentives to assign efficiently. I will discuss over popular mechanisms used in the United States and other countries. Somewhat surprisingly, I will conclude that well-designed pseudomarket (i.e. market with fake money) mechanisms obtain satisfactory results both concerning efficiency and fairness.

 

 

Torp

Claudius Torp (History)

The subsistence level in the Weimar Republic: the career of a concept

Date: Wednesday 10 March 2010 
Time: 6-7pm 
Venue: Room 1.09, New Academic Building 

Abstract: 
In the Weimar Republic the subsistence level (‘Existenzminimum’) became a contested site of material entitlement. Experts and politicians, being engaged in projects of social engineering, sought to define the term and put it into political practice. In doing so, they contributed to a debate on legitimate material expectations which testifies to Weimar’s burden of venturing to raise the standard of living in times of economic crisis. By tracing how ambitiously the concept of the subsistence level was coined in the areas of statistics, welfare administration and city planning, major lines of interpretation on Weimar history are made to converge. Thus, multiple visions of Weimar society as embodied in the concept of the subsistence level shed new light on explanations of the republic’s failure.

 

 

Vazquez-Gestal

Pablo Vázquez-Gestal (History)

Royal Identities. Performing Bourbon Majesty in Naples (1734-1759) 

Date: Wednesday 10 March 2010 
Time: 7-8pm 
Venue: Room 1.09, New Academic Building 

Astract: 
After the Spanish conquest of the kingdoms of Naples and Sicily in 1734 and 1735 respectively, a new monarchy was established in the Italian south under the leadership of Charles of Bourbon (1716-1788). Also known as ‘Don Carlos’, the former duke of Parma became the youngest sovereign of the largest and most powerful state of the Italian peninsula: the kingdom of the Two Sicilies. For that reason, he understood the need to create a system of self-representation capable of manifesting his new public identities in the context of the highly competitive Neapolitan society. This lecture will thus examine the different models of majesty developed by the new Bourbon king in Naples from 1734 onwards.

 

 

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