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Pre-Sessional courses: Research Writing September

The EUI Language Centre offers pre-sessional courses on research writing in order to prepare researchers for work in the first year. The September courses concentrate particularly on helping you emerge linguistically as an academic in your own right. By this we mean, we look at how you position yourself against the literature, how you indicate the academic conversations you identify with, how you make your academic voice heard, etc. At the same time, we begin to look at the structures and conventions of writing in your disciplines.

All September pre-sessional Research Writing courses will be held online.

You will be contacted by the Language Centre Assistant regarding the course we suggest for you. The choice of class depends on your discipline, and affinities we identify between writing samples. You will be asked to respond to the email either with a simple yes, or with any queries you may have. 
 

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The EUI Language Centre at the Convento di San Domenico


English 501


English for General Academic Purposes 

CEFR C1

1st year HEC, LAW, SPS researchers

Time & Place


3 - 29 September

  • Monday 11:00-12:30
  • Thursday 11:00-12:30

12 hours

Online

Instructor


Fergal Treanor

A solid foundation in advanced general English is fundamental for researchers at the EUI, both for completing the doctoral dissertation and for publishing in international journals. 

English for General Academic Purposes (EGAP) will complement your academic writing course. Participants will work with linking language expressing causality, contrast, sequencing, and other types of text-internal relationships. You will also expand your repertoire of academic vocabulary, collocations, and complex expressions. Other questions of advanced English grammar will be addressed as the need arises.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you will

  • be able to build clear and elegant sentences in academic English 
  • be able to link sentences and paragraphs together to produce clear, reader-friendly texts
  • have an expanded repertoire of lexicogrammatical resources for academic expression in English
  • feel more confident about your control of accuracy when writing

Course contents

Course materials are provided by the EUI English Unit.

 

The course includes work on the following:

  • Choice-making in language use
  • Prepositional collocation
  • Verb complementation
  • Textual cohesion 
  • Systemic functional grammar
  • General academic expressions 

The instructor will analyse the class needs at the beginning of the course and will accordingly give more or less weight to the various areas above.

Learning methods and activities

The methodology draws on various traditions in writing instruction, but is heavily influenced by EAP, genre-based instruction, but also Academic Literacies.

Activities in and out of class include:

  • readings
  • discussions
  • controlled exercises
  • independent writing
Work outside class will be kept to a minimum. If you wish for additional exercises, of course, your instructor will provide them for you.
 

English 502


Enhancing your academic writing: HEC

CEFR C1- C2

1st year HEC researchers

Time & Place


 3 - 29 September

  • Monday 9:00-10:30
  • Thursday 9:00-10:30

12 hours

Online

Instructor


 Benjamin Carver

 

 

 


Writing up your research is an integral part of your years as a doctoral researcher. Moreover, as a historian, whichever career path you then follow, writing is likely to remain a fundamental part of your life.

This semi-intensive course gives you the space and time to focus on how to write effectively and clearly as an academic. It looks particularly at how you can make your voice heard amongst the literature and the sources. It will also give you an idea about the work you will need to put in over the next few years to hone your academic writing skills not only in order to finish your thesis, but also to publish. 

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you will

  • have a greater awareness of textual genres and their contexts
  • have a greater understanding of how relevant aspects of the English language system can contribute to making your academic voice heard
  • be able to produce a well-structured and effective text in a clearly identifiable voice of your own

Course content

  • Course materials are provided by the EUI English Unit.
  • Additionally the participants are asked to bring in material relevant to their own research.
 

The course includes work on the following:

  • introductions
  • reader/writer relationship
  • organisational patterns of text
  • paragraph structure
  • explicitness
  • flow of ideas
  • academic style
  • useful elements of grammar

The instructor will analyse the class needs at the beginning of the course and will accordingly give more or less weight to the various areas above. 

Learning methods and activities

The methodology draws on various traditions in writing instruction, but is heavily influenced by EAP, genre-based instruction, but also Academic Literacies.

Activities in and out of class include:

  • readings
  • discussions
  • controlled exercises
  • independent writing

 

At the end of the course you will be asked to write a text explaining how a certain journal article (chosen by you) informs your research.
 

English 503


Enhancing your academic writing: LAW

CEFR C1-C2

1st year LAW & LL.M. researchers

Time & Place


4 - 29 September

  • Tuesday 9:00-10:30
  • Friday 9:00-10:30

12 hours

Online

Instructor


Benjamin Carver 

Writing up your research is an integral part of your years as a doctoral researcher. Moreover, whether you continue along an academic path or whether you become a practicing lawyer, or choose another career path, writing is likely to remain a fundamental part of your life.

This semi-intensive course gives you the space and time to focus on how to write effectively and clearly as an academic. It looks particularly at how you can make your voice heard amongst the literature, the sources, and the legislation. It will also give you an idea about the work you will need to put in over the next few years to hone your academic writing skills not only in order to finish your thesis, but also to publish. 

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, you will

  • have a greater awareness of textual genres and their contexts
  • have a greater understanding of how relevant aspects of the English language system can contribute to making your academic voice heard
  • be able to produce a well-structured and effective text in a clearly identifiable voice of your own

Course contents

  • Course materials are provided by the EUI English Unit.
  • Additionally the participants are asked to bring in material relevant to their own research.
 

 

The course includes work on the following:

  • introductions
  • reader/writer relationship
  • organisational patterns of text
  • paragraph structure
  • explicitness
  • flow of ideas
  • academic style
  • useful elements of grammar

The instructor will analyse the class needs at the beginning of the course and will accordingly give more or less weight to the various areas above. 

Learning methods and activities

The methodology draws on various traditions in writing instruction, but is heavily influenced by EAP, genre-based instruction, but also Academic Literacies.

Activities in and out of class include:

  • readings
  • discussions
  • controlled exercises
  • independent writing
At the end of the course you will be asked to write a text explaining how a certain journal article (chosen by you) informs your research.
 

English 504


Enhancing your academic writing: SPS

CEFR C1-C2

1st year SPS researchers

Time & Place


3 - 29 September

  • Monday 9:00-10:30
  • Thursday 9:00-10:30

12 hours

Online

Instructor


Fergal Treanor

Writing up your research is an integral part of your years as a doctoral researcher. Moreover, whether you continue along an academic path or whether you choose another career path, writing is likely to remain a fundamental part of your life.

This semi-intensive course gives you the space and time to focus on how to write effectively and clearly as an academic. It looks particularly at how you can make your voice heard amongst the literature, the sources, and the data. It will also give you an idea about the work you will need to put in over the next few years to hone your academic writing skills not only in order to finish your thesis, but also to publish. 

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you will

  • have a greater awareness of textual genres and their contexts
  • have a greater understanding of how relevant aspects of the English language system can contribute to making your academic voice heard
  • be able to produce a well-structured and effective text in a clearly identifiable voice of your own

Course contents

  • Course materials are provided by the EUI English Unit.
  • Additionally the participants are asked to bring in material relevant to their own research.
 

The course includes work on the following:

  • introductions
  • reader/writer relationship
  • organisational patterns of text
  • paragraph structure
  • explicitness
  • flow of ideas
  • academic style
  • useful elements of grammar

The instructor will analyse the class needs at the beginning of the course and will accordingly give more or less weight to the various areas above. 

Learning methods and activities

The methodology draws on various traditions in writing instruction, but is heavily influenced by EAP, genre-based instruction, but also Academic Literacies.

Activities in and out of class include:

  • readings
  • discussions
  • controlled exercises
  • independent writing
At the end of the course you will be asked to write a text explaining how a certain journal article (chosen by you) informs your research.
 


English 505


Fine-tuning your academic writing: LAW

CEFR C1-C2

1st year LAW & LL.M. researchers

Time & Place


3 - 15 September

  • Monday, Tuesday 11:00-12:30
  • Thursday, Friday 11:00-12:30

12 hours

Online

Instructor


Nicola Hargreaves

James Pavitt

 

Because of the large number of enrolments English 505 has been divided into two groups. The classes will take place at the same time and use the same materials. For organisational purposes only we will refer to these as 505a and 505b.
 

Writing up your research is an integral part of your years as a doctoral researcher. Moreover, whether you continue along an academic path or whether you become a practicing lawyer, or choose another career path, writing is likely to remain a fundamental part of your life.

This semi-intensive course gives you the space and time to focus on how to write effectively and clearly as an academic. It looks particularly at how you can make your voice heard amongst the literature, the sources, and the legislation. It will also give you an idea about the work you will need to put in over the next few years to hone your academic writing skills not only in order to finish your thesis, but also to publish. 

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you will

  • have a greater awareness of textual genres and their contexts
  • have a greater understanding of how relevant aspects of the English language system can contribute to making your academic voice heard
  • be able to analyse and reproduce language and organisational strategies specific to scholarly writing about law
  • be able to produce a well-structured and effective text in a clearly identifiable voice of your own

 

Course contents

  • Course materials are provided by the EUI English Unit.
  • Additionally the participants are asked to bring in material relevant to their own research.
 

The course includes work on the following:

  • reader/writer relationship
  • expressing one's own voice
  • introductions and conclusions
  • organisational patterns of text
  • flow of ideas
  • academic style
  • useful elements of grammar

The instructor will analyse the class needs at the beginning of the course and will accordingly give more or less weight to the various areas above. 

Learning methods and activities

The methodology draws on various traditions in writing instruction, but is heavily influenced by EAP, genre-based instruction, but also Academic Literacies.

Activities in and out of class include:

  • readings
  • discussions
  • controlled exercises
  • independent writing
At the end of the course you will be asked to write a text explaining how a certain journal article (chosen by you) informs your research.
 

 

English 506


Fine-tuning your academic writing: HEC

CEFR C1-C2

1st year HEC researchers

Time & Place


17 - 29 September

  • Monday, Tuesday 11.00-12.30
  • Thursday, Friday 11.00-12.30

12 hours

Online

Instructor


Libor Stepanek

 

 

 

Writing up your research is an integral part of your years as a doctoral researcher. Moreover, whether you continue along an academic path or whether you choose another career path, writing is likely to remain a fundamental part of your life.

This semi-intensive course gives you the space and time to focus on how to write effectively and clearly as an academic. It looks particularly at how you can make your voice heard amongst the literature, and the sources. It will also give you an idea about the work you will need to put in over the next few years to hone your academic writing skills not only in order to finish your thesis, but also to publish. 

Learning outcomes

  • By the end of the course, you will

    • have a greater awareness of textual genres and their contexts
    • have a greater understanding of how relevant aspects of the English language system can contribute to making your academic voice heard
    • be able to analyse and reproduce language and organisational strategies specific to academic writing about history
    • be able to produce a well-structured and effective text in a clearly identifiable voice of your own

 

 

 

Course contents

 

  • Course materials are provided by the EUI English Unit.
  • Additionally the participants are asked to bring in material relevant to their own research.
 

 

The course includes work on the following:

  • reader/writer relationship
  • expressing one's own voice
  • introductions and conclusions
  • organisational patterns of text
  • flow of ideas
  • academic style
  • useful elements of grammar

The instructor will analyse the class needs at the beginning of the course and will accordingly give more or less weight to the various areas above. 

Learning methods and activities

The methodology draws on various traditions in writing instruction, but is heavily influenced by EAP, genre-based instruction, but also Academic Literacies.

Activities in and out of class include:

  • readings
  • discussions
  • controlled exercises
  • independent writing
At the end of the course you will be asked to write a text explaining how a certain journal article (chosen by you) informs your research.
 

English 507


Fine-tuning your academic writing: SPS

CEFR C1-C2

1st year SPS researchers

Time & Place


 4 - 29 September

  • Tuesday 9:00-10:30
  • Friday 9:00-10:30

12 hours

Online

Instructor


Fergal Treanor

 

 

Writing up your research is an integral part of your years as a doctoral researcher. Moreover, whether you continue along an academic path or whether you choose another career path, writing is likely to remain a fundamental part of your life.

This semi-intensive course gives you the space and time to focus on how to write effectively and clearly as an academic. It looks particularly at how you can make your voice heard amongst the literature, the sources, and the data. It will also give you an idea about the work you will need to put in over the next few years to hone your academic writing skills not only in order to finish your thesis, but also to publish. 

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you will

  • have a greater awareness of textual genres and their contexts
  • have a greater understanding of how relevant aspects of the English language system can contribute to making your academic voice heard
  • be able to produce a well-structured and effective text in a clearly identifiable voice of your own

Course contents

  • Course materials are provided by the EUI English Unit.
  • Additionally the participants are asked to bring in material relevant to their own research.
 

The course may include work on the following:

  • reader/writer relationship
  • expressing one's own voice
  • flow of ideas
  • academic style
  • expansion and use of vocabulary
  • useful elements of grammar

The instructor will analyse the class needs at the beginning of the course and will accordingly give more or less weight to the various areas above.

Learning methods and activities

The methodology draws on various traditions in writing instruction, but is heavily influenced by EAP, genre-based instruction, but also Academic Literacies.

Activities in and out of class include:

  • readings
  • discussions
  • controlled exercises
  • independent writing
At the end of the course you will be asked to write a text explaining how a certain journal article (chosen by you) informs your research.
 

Page last updated on 07 August 2020