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An integrated Iberian empire? The Iberian Union, the Persian Gulf, and the Portuguese overseas empire (1600-1625)

Dates:
  • Tue 17 Jun 2014 10.00 - 12.00
  Add to Calendar 2014-06-17 10:00 2014-06-17 12:00 Europe/Paris An integrated Iberian empire? The Iberian Union, the Persian Gulf, and the Portuguese overseas empire (1600-1625)

This thesis is about the conflict of Hormuz (c. 1600-1625) in the context of the integration of the Portuguese overseas empire in the Hispanic Monarchy (1580-1640). As such, it addresses two main problems: firstly, it addresses the conflict of Hormuz and the way in which this conflict was managed by the decision centres of the monarchy in the articulation between Madrid and Lisbon; secondly, it addresses the integration of the Portuguese overseas empire in the Hispanic Monarchy and the way in which this integration conditioned and impacted on the evolution of the different Portuguese overseas territories during the period of the Iberian Union.
Reflecting on the importance of the Portuguese overseas territories to the global politics and equilibrium of the Hispanic Monarchy, it proposes the conception of an integrated Iberian empire. It, thus, argues that the union of the Portuguese and Castilian overseas spaces, its connections, its complementarities, and its relations of mutual dependence and influence, made it inevitable the definition of an integrated politics to the different overseas territories of the two empires.
Framing the general problems under study in the field of global history, this thesis seeks to demonstrate the inevitability of an integrated overseas politics by studying the conflict of Hormuz. It traces a general overview of what this conflict was in the first quarter of the seventeenth century, of the Eurasian powers and actors that were involved, of the geostrategic interests in question, as well as, above all, of the global dimension of the conflict. In order to do so, it analyses two aspects that were central to the conflict of Hormuz, while also being directly related with the union of the Portuguese and Castilian crowns: the question of the Persian silk trade, and the question of defence and resources’ management. It does so by analysing its global links and interconnections.
In the end, it argues that the evolution of the Portuguese position in Hormuz and in the Persian Gulf during the first two decades of the sixteen hundreds was conditioned by the minor status that was attributed to the region by Castile in a wider framework of priorities, where other Portuguese overseas spaces were privileged: such were the cases of the Portuguese territories in Southeast Asia and the Far East, as well as in the Atlantic.

Cappella, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA DD/MM/YYYY
  Cappella, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA

This thesis is about the conflict of Hormuz (c. 1600-1625) in the context of the integration of the Portuguese overseas empire in the Hispanic Monarchy (1580-1640). As such, it addresses two main problems: firstly, it addresses the conflict of Hormuz and the way in which this conflict was managed by the decision centres of the monarchy in the articulation between Madrid and Lisbon; secondly, it addresses the integration of the Portuguese overseas empire in the Hispanic Monarchy and the way in which this integration conditioned and impacted on the evolution of the different Portuguese overseas territories during the period of the Iberian Union.
Reflecting on the importance of the Portuguese overseas territories to the global politics and equilibrium of the Hispanic Monarchy, it proposes the conception of an integrated Iberian empire. It, thus, argues that the union of the Portuguese and Castilian overseas spaces, its connections, its complementarities, and its relations of mutual dependence and influence, made it inevitable the definition of an integrated politics to the different overseas territories of the two empires.
Framing the general problems under study in the field of global history, this thesis seeks to demonstrate the inevitability of an integrated overseas politics by studying the conflict of Hormuz. It traces a general overview of what this conflict was in the first quarter of the seventeenth century, of the Eurasian powers and actors that were involved, of the geostrategic interests in question, as well as, above all, of the global dimension of the conflict. In order to do so, it analyses two aspects that were central to the conflict of Hormuz, while also being directly related with the union of the Portuguese and Castilian crowns: the question of the Persian silk trade, and the question of defence and resources’ management. It does so by analysing its global links and interconnections.
In the end, it argues that the evolution of the Portuguese position in Hormuz and in the Persian Gulf during the first two decades of the sixteen hundreds was conditioned by the minor status that was attributed to the region by Castile in a wider framework of priorities, where other Portuguese overseas spaces were privileged: such were the cases of the Portuguese territories in Southeast Asia and the Far East, as well as in the Atlantic.


Location:
Cappella, Villa Schifanoia - SCHIFANOIA

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Thesis defence

Examiner:
Prof. Bartolomé Yun Casalilla (EUI and Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla)
Prof. João Paulo Azevedo de Oliveira e Costa (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)
Prof. Dejanirah Couto (École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris)

Supervisor:
Jorge Flores (European University Institute)

Contact:
Roberta Saccon - Send a mail

Defendant:
Maria Da Graça de Almeida Borges (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
 

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