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What Motivates Representatives to Defend Minority Interests During the Legislative Process? (Political Behaviour Colloquium)

Dates:
  • Thu 25 Feb 2016 17.00 - 19.00
  Add to Calendar 2016-02-25 17:00 2016-02-25 19:00 Europe/Paris What Motivates Representatives to Defend Minority Interests During the Legislative Process? (Political Behaviour Colloquium)

What motivates representatives to promote minority interests during the policy making process? Membership in minority parties is commonly assumed to be a major driver of substantive representation, but running for election in minority districts also sets incentives for legislators to engage in issues relevant for minorities. In this article, I provide a first test for these explanations from a cross-country perspective using an original data set that includes 4,122 representatives in 14 EU and OECD member countries. The data set draws on representatives' membership in minority committees as an indicator for substantive representation. My findings show that both characteristics of legislators, membership in minority parties and election in minority districts indeed motivate representatives to join minority committees. However, the effect of membership in minority parties seems to be weaker, suggesting that the electoral accountability mechanisms created through minority districts set a much stronger incentive for representatives to engage in substantive representation of minorities. In this manner, this research shows that cross-country comparisons in the field of substantive representation are possible and should be pursued more frequently.

Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana

What motivates representatives to promote minority interests during the policy making process? Membership in minority parties is commonly assumed to be a major driver of substantive representation, but running for election in minority districts also sets incentives for legislators to engage in issues relevant for minorities. In this article, I provide a first test for these explanations from a cross-country perspective using an original data set that includes 4,122 representatives in 14 EU and OECD member countries. The data set draws on representatives' membership in minority committees as an indicator for substantive representation. My findings show that both characteristics of legislators, membership in minority parties and election in minority districts indeed motivate representatives to join minority committees. However, the effect of membership in minority parties seems to be weaker, suggesting that the electoral accountability mechanisms created through minority districts set a much stronger incentive for representatives to engage in substantive representation of minorities. In this manner, this research shows that cross-country comparisons in the field of substantive representation are possible and should be pursued more frequently.


Location:
Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Organiser:
Prof. Alexander Trechsel ( Univ. Lucerne)
Enrique Hernández Pérez (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Mathilde Maria Van Ditmars (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Contact:
Mariana Spratley (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Speaker:
Corinna Kröber (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences / University of Salzburg)
 
 

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