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Muslim Rome: Horizons of the Renaissance in the Ottoman Mediterranean

Dates:
  • Wed 30 Nov 2016 15.30 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2016-11-30 15:30 2016-11-30 17:00 Europe/Paris Muslim Rome: Horizons of the Renaissance in the Ottoman Mediterranean

HEC Colloquium In the decades following the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople—a city originally founded as the New Rome —the ruling elite of the Ottoman empire came to identify itself not as Turkish or even as Ottoman, but rather as Roman (literally Rumi). Curiously, this Ottoman embrace of Roman identity closely coincided with the rise, first in Italy and then in the rest of the Latin West, of Renaissance Humanism, an intellectual movement committed to the comprehensive recovery, study, and emulation of the Greco-Roman past. The simultaneous reappearance of Romanitas on both sides of the early modern Mediterranean gives rise to a series of interrelated and, until now, surprisingly under-researched questions about the region’s shared intellectual history. To what extent did Ottoman claims to be Roman intersect with, influence, or oppose the efforts of contemporary European humanists to appropriate the legacy of classical antiquity? In what ways were their arguments based on direct engagement with the intellectual, cultural and artistic legacy of the Greco-Roman world? How did they reconcile being Roman with being Muslim? What was at stake politically in choosing to frame their empire’s identity in this way? And why, and through what means, was Ottoman Rome eventually forgotten? These questions form the subject of an ongoing book project, but will be addressed in this talk through an illustrative case study: the early sixteenth-century Ottoman author Salih Celalzade and his possible interactions with contemporary European humanists.

Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle

HEC Colloquium In the decades following the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople—a city originally founded as the New Rome —the ruling elite of the Ottoman empire came to identify itself not as Turkish or even as Ottoman, but rather as Roman (literally Rumi). Curiously, this Ottoman embrace of Roman identity closely coincided with the rise, first in Italy and then in the rest of the Latin West, of Renaissance Humanism, an intellectual movement committed to the comprehensive recovery, study, and emulation of the Greco-Roman past. The simultaneous reappearance of Romanitas on both sides of the early modern Mediterranean gives rise to a series of interrelated and, until now, surprisingly under-researched questions about the region’s shared intellectual history. To what extent did Ottoman claims to be Roman intersect with, influence, or oppose the efforts of contemporary European humanists to appropriate the legacy of classical antiquity? In what ways were their arguments based on direct engagement with the intellectual, cultural and artistic legacy of the Greco-Roman world? How did they reconcile being Roman with being Muslim? What was at stake politically in choosing to frame their empire’s identity in this way? And why, and through what means, was Ottoman Rome eventually forgotten? These questions form the subject of an ongoing book project, but will be addressed in this talk through an illustrative case study: the early sixteenth-century Ottoman author Salih Celalzade and his possible interactions with contemporary European humanists.


Location:
Sala degli Stemmi - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Lecture

Organiser:
Prof. Luca Molà (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
Corinna Ruth Unger

Speaker:
Giancarlo Casale

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