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Freedom in Conflict. On Kant’s Critique of Medical Reason

Dates:
  • Fri 24 Feb 2017 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2017-02-24 15:00 2017-02-24 17:00 Europe/Paris Freedom in Conflict. On Kant’s Critique of Medical Reason

This thesis undertakes a double task by on the one hand analysing 18th century medicine within the context of Immanuel Kant’s work and on the other hand analysing Kant’s work within the context of 18th century medicine. Drawing on a series of Kant’s writings on medicine, often discarded as marginal, his work is re-located within the context of 18th century medical reforms and scientific revolutions. Focusing on the initial conflation between 18th century medicine and philosophy the thesis traces the growing disciplinary distinctions between the two in their rivalling views on the science of man. By focusing on the changing attitudes towards his own long lasting engagement with medicine, it is demonstrated how Kant becomes increasingly self-critical. It is argued that Kant’s philosophy is developed as a critical reflection of a growing medicalization of human life, which fails to perceive man as a free agent.

Sala dei Levrieri - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala dei Levrieri - Villa Salviati- Castle

This thesis undertakes a double task by on the one hand analysing 18th century medicine within the context of Immanuel Kant’s work and on the other hand analysing Kant’s work within the context of 18th century medicine. Drawing on a series of Kant’s writings on medicine, often discarded as marginal, his work is re-located within the context of 18th century medical reforms and scientific revolutions. Focusing on the initial conflation between 18th century medicine and philosophy the thesis traces the growing disciplinary distinctions between the two in their rivalling views on the science of man. By focusing on the changing attitudes towards his own long lasting engagement with medicine, it is demonstrated how Kant becomes increasingly self-critical. It is argued that Kant’s philosophy is developed as a critical reflection of a growing medicalization of human life, which fails to perceive man as a free agent.


Location:
Sala dei Levrieri - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Thesis defence

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Supervisor:
Martin van Gelderen (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Examiner:
Prof. Hans Boedeker (Max-Planck-Institut für Geschichte)
Stéphane Van Damme (EUI and Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris)
Dr. Avi Lifschitz (University College, London)

Defendant:
Jonas Gerlings (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

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