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The Peripheries of the European Revolutionary Process(es) 1917–1923

Dates:
  • Thu 05 Oct 2017 12.30 - 19.30
  • Fri 06 Oct 2017 09.30 - 19.30
  • Sat 07 Oct 2017 09.30 - 13.30
  Add to Calendar 2017-10-05 12:30 2017-10-07 13:30 Europe/Paris The Peripheries of the European Revolutionary Process(es) 1917–1923

The Russian Revolution was a watershed event in global history. The transformations it occasioned lastingly shaped the world order. Its reverberations were felt well beyond the borders of the Tsarist empire. Many of its protagonists conceived it as the first act of the world revolution – an impression that was shared by many abroad, both friends and foes. The revolution inaugurated a period of pan-European agitations unseen since 1848. The centenary of 1917 has rekindled interest for the Russian Revolution and its global significance, which is being revisited through innovative prisms, shedding light on disregarded actors, networks, and ideas. This international conference aims to put the EUI at the forefront of the resurgent historiography on the Russian Revolution and the European upheavals it inspired by reassessing its global impact from the margins. We propose to shift attention away from the well-known splits and schisms in Social Democracy to focus on the reception of the Bolshevik Revolution by unconventional groups of radicals, iconoclasts, and revolutionaries that have been frequently forgotten by the historiography: nationalists, feminists, anarchists, republicans, etc., who struck temporary and often tense and fragile alliances with the Bolsheviks. We are interested in studying the way these groups understood and assimilated the news coming from the east; in the blurry and unstable but also mythical and rousing images conjured by the revolution; and the networks and channels through which they learned about the revolution and engaged with the Bolsheviks and the nascent Third International. Not only are we concerned with the ideological peripheries of the European revolutionary movement, but also on its geographic peripheries, and are particularly interested in case studies that move away from the Central European shatterzones to less studied corners of the continent.

Theatre - Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Theatre - Badia Fiesolana

The Russian Revolution was a watershed event in global history. The transformations it occasioned lastingly shaped the world order. Its reverberations were felt well beyond the borders of the Tsarist empire. Many of its protagonists conceived it as the first act of the world revolution – an impression that was shared by many abroad, both friends and foes. The revolution inaugurated a period of pan-European agitations unseen since 1848. The centenary of 1917 has rekindled interest for the Russian Revolution and its global significance, which is being revisited through innovative prisms, shedding light on disregarded actors, networks, and ideas. This international conference aims to put the EUI at the forefront of the resurgent historiography on the Russian Revolution and the European upheavals it inspired by reassessing its global impact from the margins. We propose to shift attention away from the well-known splits and schisms in Social Democracy to focus on the reception of the Bolshevik Revolution by unconventional groups of radicals, iconoclasts, and revolutionaries that have been frequently forgotten by the historiography: nationalists, feminists, anarchists, republicans, etc., who struck temporary and often tense and fragile alliances with the Bolsheviks. We are interested in studying the way these groups understood and assimilated the news coming from the east; in the blurry and unstable but also mythical and rousing images conjured by the revolution; and the networks and channels through which they learned about the revolution and engaged with the Bolsheviks and the nascent Third International. Not only are we concerned with the ideological peripheries of the European revolutionary movement, but also on its geographic peripheries, and are particularly interested in case studies that move away from the Central European shatterzones to less studied corners of the continent.


Location:
Theatre - Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies

Type:
Conference

Contact:
Jan Rybak (EUI - Department of History and Civilization) - Send a mail

Organiser:
Jan Rybak (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
Arturo Zoffmann Rodriguez (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Attachment:
Privacy statement
Programme

Links:
Conference website

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