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Europe in the World Research Seminar - An Inquiry Into The Regularity Of Presidential Rule In Ten Countries Of Sub-Saharan Africa (postponed to a later date)

Dates:
  • Thu 16 Nov 2017 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2017-11-16 16:00 2017-11-16 18:00 Europe/Paris Europe in the World Research Seminar - An Inquiry Into The Regularity Of Presidential Rule In Ten Countries Of Sub-Saharan Africa (postponed to a later date)

This presentation examines the ‘regularity’ of presidential rule in sub-Saharan Africa. ‘Regular’ presidencies are those where elected leaders abide by constitutional and legal requirements that govern the length of presidential terms. Blondel counts five presidencies in sub-Saharan Africa that have been ‘regular’ since they became independent—Botswana, Namibia, Senegal, Tanzania, and Mozambique. He also identifies five countries that became regular years or decades after their independence—Benin, Uganda, Ghana, Liberia, and Nigeria. In addition to analysing why some countries have been able to adopt ‘regular’ presidencies and others have not, Blondel will also discuss the origins and diffusion of presidential rule—first in the United States, then to Latin America, and, following decolonization, to sub-Saharan Africa.

No Room DD/MM/YYYY
  No Room

This presentation examines the ‘regularity’ of presidential rule in sub-Saharan Africa. ‘Regular’ presidencies are those where elected leaders abide by constitutional and legal requirements that govern the length of presidential terms. Blondel counts five presidencies in sub-Saharan Africa that have been ‘regular’ since they became independent—Botswana, Namibia, Senegal, Tanzania, and Mozambique. He also identifies five countries that became regular years or decades after their independence—Benin, Uganda, Ghana, Liberia, and Nigeria. In addition to analysing why some countries have been able to adopt ‘regular’ presidencies and others have not, Blondel will also discuss the origins and diffusion of presidential rule—first in the United States, then to Latin America, and, following decolonization, to sub-Saharan Africa.


Location:
No Room

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies
Department of Political and Social Sciences
Department of History and Civilization
Max Weber Programme

Type:
Seminar

Organiser:
Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)
Professor Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS and SPS)
Richard Maher (EUI - RSCAS)

Speaker:
Jean Blondel

Contact:
Naïs Ralaison - Send a mail

Links:
Global Governance Programme
 
 

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Page last updated on 18 August 2017