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The Future in the Past: Victory, Defeat, and Comparative Grand Strategy, Research seminar

Dates:
  • Tue 06 Feb 2018 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-02-06 16:00 2018-02-06 18:00 Europe/Paris The Future in the Past: Victory, Defeat, and Comparative Grand Strategy, Research seminar

Paul van Hooft will present his book project, the central argument of which is that experiences with victory and defeat in the Second World War drove American, British, French, and German policymakers to either persistently over- or underestimate the efficacy of military force and multilateral diplomacy, and to overlook or insufficiently appreciate alternative courses of actions. To test the argument that victory and defeat in total war matter for the generations that follow, the Second World War provides an excellent historical case. Lessons of war can be contradictory and, while certain wars linger on in the collective imagination, others are forgotten. The Second World War is the central war that involved all the major states and also spelled the end of the Europe-centric world. The war contained a vast disparity in outcomes between winners and losers: some states suffered massive amounts of military casualties and unimaginable atrocities against citizens, whereas others barely did. Crucially, this allows for a multi-method test of the theory that includes historical cases, document analysis, interviews, counterfactuals, and regression analysis. The book focuses on two extreme cases of victory and defeat (the US and Germany), as well as two more complex cases (the UK and France). Their different experiences created enduring trans-Atlantic differences in beliefs on threats, ends, and means that have lasted from the Cold War into the present.

Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Paul van Hooft will present his book project, the central argument of which is that experiences with victory and defeat in the Second World War drove American, British, French, and German policymakers to either persistently over- or underestimate the efficacy of military force and multilateral diplomacy, and to overlook or insufficiently appreciate alternative courses of actions. To test the argument that victory and defeat in total war matter for the generations that follow, the Second World War provides an excellent historical case. Lessons of war can be contradictory and, while certain wars linger on in the collective imagination, others are forgotten. The Second World War is the central war that involved all the major states and also spelled the end of the Europe-centric world. The war contained a vast disparity in outcomes between winners and losers: some states suffered massive amounts of military casualties and unimaginable atrocities against citizens, whereas others barely did. Crucially, this allows for a multi-method test of the theory that includes historical cases, document analysis, interviews, counterfactuals, and regression analysis. The book focuses on two extreme cases of victory and defeat (the US and Germany), as well as two more complex cases (the UK and France). Their different experiences created enduring trans-Atlantic differences in beliefs on threats, ends, and means that have lasted from the Cold War into the present.


Location:
Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies

Type:
Seminar

Organiser:
Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)
Professor Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS and SPS)
Richard Maher (EUI - RSCAS)

Discussant:
Jonas Johannes Driedger (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Contact:
Naïs Ralaison - Send a mail

Speaker:
Max Weber fellow 2016-2018 van Hooft Paul (European University Institute)

Links:
Global Governance Programme
 
 

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