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Europe and the nuclear scare of the Eighties: the European debate on the nuclear issue and antinuclear movements.

Dates:
  • Fri 17 Nov 2017 11.30 - 13.00
  Add to Calendar 2017-11-17 11:30 2017-11-17 13:00 Europe/Paris Europe and the nuclear scare of the Eighties: the European debate on the nuclear issue and antinuclear movements.

This research focuses on the European antinuclear movement, looking more closely at the origins and evolution of the no-nukes mobilization in Europe between 1977 and 1987 and the public debate at the European level fostered by antinuclear movements.
The movement that blossomed in this period was in some ways different when compared to the previous upsurge of antinuclear protests. This third wave of antinuclear criticism was characterized by the overlapping between pacifist and environmental issues: the concerns over radioactive contamination and the environmental dangers posed by the civilian nuclear industry intermingled with the fear of a nuclear war between the two superpowers and its potentially devastating consequences for life on earth. Moreover, the movement of the Eighties had a transnational dimension related both to the cooperation developed by the European and the American organizations but also to the emerging awareness, shared by protesters on both side of the Atlantic, that nuclear weapons had fostered a more integrated and interdependent world.
This research aims at examining if the protests against civil and military nuclear technology, during the period 1977-1987, produced a European public debate on the nuclear danger. In 1977, first European antinuclear protests emerged against the neutron bomb, while in 1987 the two superpowers signed the INF treaty and the UN World Commission on Environment and Development released the Brundtland Report, which officially introduced the concept of sustainable development. This is therefore a decisive decade since in Europe there is the consolidation of an environmental awareness and also sharp criticism against nuclear power plants. While recent historiography has focused on national anti-nuclear campaigns or on attempts made by national groups to establish contacts at the transnational level, no attention has been devoted to the European dimension of this season of protest. The research thus intends to focus on how the controversy on nuclear technology was transposed, discussed and dealt with at the European level.

Sala A.De Gasperi Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala A.De Gasperi Villa Salviati

This research focuses on the European antinuclear movement, looking more closely at the origins and evolution of the no-nukes mobilization in Europe between 1977 and 1987 and the public debate at the European level fostered by antinuclear movements.
The movement that blossomed in this period was in some ways different when compared to the previous upsurge of antinuclear protests. This third wave of antinuclear criticism was characterized by the overlapping between pacifist and environmental issues: the concerns over radioactive contamination and the environmental dangers posed by the civilian nuclear industry intermingled with the fear of a nuclear war between the two superpowers and its potentially devastating consequences for life on earth. Moreover, the movement of the Eighties had a transnational dimension related both to the cooperation developed by the European and the American organizations but also to the emerging awareness, shared by protesters on both side of the Atlantic, that nuclear weapons had fostered a more integrated and interdependent world.
This research aims at examining if the protests against civil and military nuclear technology, during the period 1977-1987, produced a European public debate on the nuclear danger. In 1977, first European antinuclear protests emerged against the neutron bomb, while in 1987 the two superpowers signed the INF treaty and the UN World Commission on Environment and Development released the Brundtland Report, which officially introduced the concept of sustainable development. This is therefore a decisive decade since in Europe there is the consolidation of an environmental awareness and also sharp criticism against nuclear power plants. While recent historiography has focused on national anti-nuclear campaigns or on attempts made by national groups to establish contacts at the transnational level, no attention has been devoted to the European dimension of this season of protest. The research thus intends to focus on how the controversy on nuclear technology was transposed, discussed and dealt with at the European level.


Location:
Sala A.De Gasperi Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Historical Archives

Type:
Seminar

Contact:
Claudia Fanti - Send a mail

Discussant:
Giuliano Garavini (NYU Abu Dhabi/European University Institute)

Speaker:
Angela Santese (University of Bologna)
 
 
 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017