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Private Gardens and Public Spaces in 18th-century Paris

Dates:
  • Tue 08 May 2018 11.00 - 13.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-05-08 11:00 2018-05-08 13:00 Europe/Paris Private Gardens and Public Spaces in 18th-century Paris

The Treaty of Paris of 1763 reshaped many aspects of the relationship between France and Britain and their respective societies. The major consequence for France, the surrender of most of France’s North American landholdings and major colonies of New France and Louisiana, but retaining the Carribean islands, had significant consequences at home as well - including, paradoxically, an influx of private capital investment from colonial traders and retired military officers. It also occasioned a cultural reassessment by the French of English taste and manners, which suddenly seemed less barbarous and more authentic, even elegant.

At the same time, and as a direct result of the financial and political debacle of the war’s outcome, the French crown pursued administrative state which had been pursued actively under Louis XV, were intensified by the political rise of Turgot. This included changes in law and governance of France’s large cities, including Paris, which included tax and land-use policies to encourage the expansion of the city and the opening of its thoroughfares and sightlines.

The consequence was a building boom, especially in residential housing. While mostly concentrated to the north and west of the city, there were also new, genteel homes developed along the outer edge of newly constructed boulevards.

This paper will be a discussion of some of the cultural consequences of this building boom, changes in the theory and practice of architectural design, gardens, and material culture - as the boundaries of public and private space were renegotiated on the eve of the Revolution.

Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati

The Treaty of Paris of 1763 reshaped many aspects of the relationship between France and Britain and their respective societies. The major consequence for France, the surrender of most of France’s North American landholdings and major colonies of New France and Louisiana, but retaining the Carribean islands, had significant consequences at home as well - including, paradoxically, an influx of private capital investment from colonial traders and retired military officers. It also occasioned a cultural reassessment by the French of English taste and manners, which suddenly seemed less barbarous and more authentic, even elegant.

At the same time, and as a direct result of the financial and political debacle of the war’s outcome, the French crown pursued administrative state which had been pursued actively under Louis XV, were intensified by the political rise of Turgot. This included changes in law and governance of France’s large cities, including Paris, which included tax and land-use policies to encourage the expansion of the city and the opening of its thoroughfares and sightlines.

The consequence was a building boom, especially in residential housing. While mostly concentrated to the north and west of the city, there were also new, genteel homes developed along the outer edge of newly constructed boulevards.

This paper will be a discussion of some of the cultural consequences of this building boom, changes in the theory and practice of architectural design, gardens, and material culture - as the boundaries of public and private space were renegotiated on the eve of the Revolution.


Location:
Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Lecture

Organiser:
Stéphane Van Damme

Contact:
Miriam Felicia Curci - Send a mail

Speaker:
Gregory Brown (UNLV - University of Nevada)

Attachment:
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