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Class politics in Peripheral Capitalism after the Crisis

Dates:
  • Thu 26 Apr 2018 09.00 - 16.30
  • Fri 27 Apr 2018 09.30 - 15.45
  Add to Calendar 2018-04-26 9:00 2018-04-27 15:45 Europe/Paris Class politics in Peripheral Capitalism after the Crisis

Workshop Outline
The Great Recession has led to a surprising decline of class politics. While in the immediate aftermath of the crisis labor parties, left wing social movements and organizations were able to mobilize and formulate policy responses, the left wing moment was short-lived. Soon technocratic and (often right wing) populist responses to the crisis prevailed. Academic discussions reflect this. Here, the debate is currently focussed on the rise of “identity based” populism rather than class politics.
This bottom-up workshop, by contrast, seeks to bring class back in. It asks whether and how class politics and the study of the wider structural changes of capitalism have analytical clout in explaining responses to the crisis. Specifically, the workshop aims to address the following questions: what is the role of organized labour in the time of austerity and populism? What has been the effect of the recession and austerity on labour parties, trade unions and the welfare state? What was labour’s response in the aftermath of the crisis, when the tensions between unregulated capitalism and democracy emerged more clearly?
The workshop aims to address these issues based on a dialogue among different theoretical approaches and fields such as political economy, developmental and democratization studies, historical analyses and economic sociology. The geographical focus of the workshop is the periphery broadly understood as both the EU periphery and the global South. This includes Southern and Eastern Europe, MENA countries and Latin America. The focus on peripheral capitalisms (characterized by precarious employment, cronyism, and low institutional comparative advantages) reflects the conviction that at the margins the crisis triggered its most destabilizing effects.

The workshop will include five keynote speeches by Bela Greskovits (Central European University, EUI Robert Schuman Fellow), Guglielmo Meardi (Warwick Business School), Line Rennwald (University of Geneva), Sanna Salo (Stockholm University) and Benjamin Selwyn (University of Sussex, currently visiting fellow at EUI), - and paper presentations by young researchers.

EUI researchers can apply for credits (10) upon participation either as paper presenter or discussant, or upon writing a short response paper on the topic of discussion.

Scholars interested in presenting their research have to send an abstract of their paper by March 4th, 2018 and submit a complete draft by April 12, 2018.

Seminar Room, Villa Malafrasca DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room, Villa Malafrasca

Workshop Outline
The Great Recession has led to a surprising decline of class politics. While in the immediate aftermath of the crisis labor parties, left wing social movements and organizations were able to mobilize and formulate policy responses, the left wing moment was short-lived. Soon technocratic and (often right wing) populist responses to the crisis prevailed. Academic discussions reflect this. Here, the debate is currently focussed on the rise of “identity based” populism rather than class politics.
This bottom-up workshop, by contrast, seeks to bring class back in. It asks whether and how class politics and the study of the wider structural changes of capitalism have analytical clout in explaining responses to the crisis. Specifically, the workshop aims to address the following questions: what is the role of organized labour in the time of austerity and populism? What has been the effect of the recession and austerity on labour parties, trade unions and the welfare state? What was labour’s response in the aftermath of the crisis, when the tensions between unregulated capitalism and democracy emerged more clearly?
The workshop aims to address these issues based on a dialogue among different theoretical approaches and fields such as political economy, developmental and democratization studies, historical analyses and economic sociology. The geographical focus of the workshop is the periphery broadly understood as both the EU periphery and the global South. This includes Southern and Eastern Europe, MENA countries and Latin America. The focus on peripheral capitalisms (characterized by precarious employment, cronyism, and low institutional comparative advantages) reflects the conviction that at the margins the crisis triggered its most destabilizing effects.

The workshop will include five keynote speeches by Bela Greskovits (Central European University, EUI Robert Schuman Fellow), Guglielmo Meardi (Warwick Business School), Line Rennwald (University of Geneva), Sanna Salo (Stockholm University) and Benjamin Selwyn (University of Sussex, currently visiting fellow at EUI), - and paper presentations by young researchers.

EUI researchers can apply for credits (10) upon participation either as paper presenter or discussant, or upon writing a short response paper on the topic of discussion.

Scholars interested in presenting their research have to send an abstract of their paper by March 4th, 2018 and submit a complete draft by April 12, 2018.


Location:
Seminar Room, Villa Malafrasca

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Workshop

Organiser:
Prof. Dorothee Bohle (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Valentina Petrovic (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Francesco Bagnardi (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Contact:
Jennifer Rose Dari (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Attachment:
Programme
 
 

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