« Back to all events

The Origins of a common European Middle East Policy, late 1970s-early1980s - The Case of the Venice Declaration and its follow-up initiative (Seminar Series of the ADGRC)

Dates:
  • Fri 23 Mar 2018 15.00 - 16.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-03-23 15:00 2018-03-23 16:00 Europe/Paris The Origins of a common European Middle East Policy, late 1970s-early1980s - The Case of the Venice Declaration and its follow-up initiative (Seminar Series of the ADGRC)

This paper seeks to explain how and why the European Union (EU) got involved in the Arab-Israeli conflict. The origins of the current policy can be traced back to the 1970s, when the then Nine member states of the European Community (EC) started coordinating their approach to the Middle East conflict through their newly created mechanism for foreign policy coordination – European Political Cooperation (EPC). The Nine’s formal engagement began on 13 June 1980, when the European Council, gathering in Venice, issued a declaration which recognised the Palestinian right to self-determination, called for the association of the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) to the peace process and announced the Nine’s first diplomatic initiative. The Venice Declaration constitutes Europe’s earliest formulation of the two-state solution, and today, the EU regards it as the foundational statement of its Middle East policy. At present, the historical analysis of the origins of Europe’s involvement in the Arab-Israeli conflict is very limited. By contrast, the political science literature has taken a significant interest in this topic, but overwhelmingly regards the Venice Declaration and its follow-up initiative as a failure. It seems that historians have, for now, mostly accepted this conclusion. Using French, British, and American archives, this paper offers a reassessment of the emergence of a common European Middle East policy, and argues that the current analysis does not do the Venice Declaration and its follow-up initiative justice.

Sala A.De Gasperi Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala A.De Gasperi Villa Salviati

This paper seeks to explain how and why the European Union (EU) got involved in the Arab-Israeli conflict. The origins of the current policy can be traced back to the 1970s, when the then Nine member states of the European Community (EC) started coordinating their approach to the Middle East conflict through their newly created mechanism for foreign policy coordination – European Political Cooperation (EPC). The Nine’s formal engagement began on 13 June 1980, when the European Council, gathering in Venice, issued a declaration which recognised the Palestinian right to self-determination, called for the association of the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO) to the peace process and announced the Nine’s first diplomatic initiative. The Venice Declaration constitutes Europe’s earliest formulation of the two-state solution, and today, the EU regards it as the foundational statement of its Middle East policy. At present, the historical analysis of the origins of Europe’s involvement in the Arab-Israeli conflict is very limited. By contrast, the political science literature has taken a significant interest in this topic, but overwhelmingly regards the Venice Declaration and its follow-up initiative as a failure. It seems that historians have, for now, mostly accepted this conclusion. Using French, British, and American archives, this paper offers a reassessment of the emergence of a common European Middle East policy, and argues that the current analysis does not do the Venice Declaration and its follow-up initiative justice.


Location:
Sala A.De Gasperi Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Historical Archives

Type:
Seminar

Discussant:
Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)

Contact:
Claudia Fanti - Send a mail

Speaker:
Visiting/Exchange Student, academic year 2017-2018, HEC Department (EUI) Alexandre Dab (London School of Economics)
 
 
 

Page last updated on 10 November 2016