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Educational Entrepreneurs and the Politics of Schooling in Nineteenth-Century Habsburg Society

Dates:
  • Thu 14 Jun 2018 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-06-14 15:00 2018-06-14 17:00 Europe/Paris Educational Entrepreneurs and the Politics of Schooling in Nineteenth-Century Habsburg Society

In the Habsburg Empire the implementation of compulsory education in 1774 marked a new era. The development and monitoring of educational measures in the following decades was in the past frequently described as a linear narrative of progress until the present day. However, it was not the desire for educational advancement but social anxieties and economic considerations which were usually the driving force for educational policies as numerous examples in this thesis document. The instilment of morality was seen as the main purpose of education for the vast majority of the population. My examination of a broad range of sources reveals how this focus on morality and a general climate of fear during the period of the Napoleonic Wars created the basis for educational structures that were effective until the Primary School Law of 1869 and beyond. Policies created during this period forced for example factory owners to concern themselves with the education of their child labourers and at the same time opened spaces for women and men to engage in the business of private schooling. The strict spatial segregation of female and male pupils enabled women to exercise agency as private school owners. By investigating the possibilities, limitations and practical consequences of the politics of schooling this thesis adds complexity to our understanding of nineteenth century Habsburg society.

Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

In the Habsburg Empire the implementation of compulsory education in 1774 marked a new era. The development and monitoring of educational measures in the following decades was in the past frequently described as a linear narrative of progress until the present day. However, it was not the desire for educational advancement but social anxieties and economic considerations which were usually the driving force for educational policies as numerous examples in this thesis document. The instilment of morality was seen as the main purpose of education for the vast majority of the population. My examination of a broad range of sources reveals how this focus on morality and a general climate of fear during the period of the Napoleonic Wars created the basis for educational structures that were effective until the Primary School Law of 1869 and beyond. Policies created during this period forced for example factory owners to concern themselves with the education of their child labourers and at the same time opened spaces for women and men to engage in the business of private schooling. The strict spatial segregation of female and male pupils enabled women to exercise agency as private school owners. By investigating the possibilities, limitations and practical consequences of the politics of schooling this thesis adds complexity to our understanding of nineteenth century Habsburg society.


Location:
Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Thesis defence

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Examiner:
Gabriella Hauch (University of Linz)
Laura Downs (EUI)
Gunda Barth-Scalmani (Universitaet Innsbruck)

Defendant:
Waltraud Schuetz (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Supervisor:
Pieter M. Judson (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Attachment:
Privacy

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