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Europe’s Northern Resource Frontier: The political economy of resource nationalism in Sweden and Norway 1888-1936

Dates:
  • Thu 28 Jun 2018 14.15 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-06-28 14:15 2018-06-28 17:00 Europe/Paris Europe’s Northern Resource Frontier: The political economy of resource nationalism in Sweden and Norway 1888-1936

As demands for raw materials surged following the second industrial revolution, countries such as Sweden and Norway, where natural resources were in greater abundance than people and industry, were faced with a dilemma. Raw materials exports opened up new opportunities for growth and prosperity, but could also mean increased dependence on the more populous and powerful industrialized European states, especially as they were often the source of the capital and entrepreneurship needed to expand the resource industries. Consequently, critics of the prevailing liberal order called for political intervention and regulation of the countries’ most valuable natural resources in order to secure greater national control over their use and the rents they generated. This phenomenon is now commonly referred to as resource nationalism, and has been frequently studied and debated in the context of de-colonization in the post-war era. However, resource nationalism in the first wave of globalization and in European resource exporting countries have largely been neglected. This thesis examines the introduction and evolution of resource nationalist policies in Sweden and Norway. Relying on a broad array of government and parliamentary records, this thesis seeks to answer how the policymakers squared resource nationalist interventions with a wider understanding of the rules of the game of the international economy, as well as the how and to what extent domestic economic interest groups influenced the outcome. Through these inquiries, the thesis sheds new light on how and why the two countries’ regulatory systems were different, and ultimately how these systems differ from later theories and predictions about resource nationalism.

Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

As demands for raw materials surged following the second industrial revolution, countries such as Sweden and Norway, where natural resources were in greater abundance than people and industry, were faced with a dilemma. Raw materials exports opened up new opportunities for growth and prosperity, but could also mean increased dependence on the more populous and powerful industrialized European states, especially as they were often the source of the capital and entrepreneurship needed to expand the resource industries. Consequently, critics of the prevailing liberal order called for political intervention and regulation of the countries’ most valuable natural resources in order to secure greater national control over their use and the rents they generated. This phenomenon is now commonly referred to as resource nationalism, and has been frequently studied and debated in the context of de-colonization in the post-war era. However, resource nationalism in the first wave of globalization and in European resource exporting countries have largely been neglected. This thesis examines the introduction and evolution of resource nationalist policies in Sweden and Norway. Relying on a broad array of government and parliamentary records, this thesis seeks to answer how the policymakers squared resource nationalist interventions with a wider understanding of the rules of the game of the international economy, as well as the how and to what extent domestic economic interest groups influenced the outcome. Through these inquiries, the thesis sheds new light on how and why the two countries’ regulatory systems were different, and ultimately how these systems differ from later theories and predictions about resource nationalism.


Location:
Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Thesis defence

Supervisor:
Prof. Youssef Cassis (EUI)

Examiner:
Alexander Etkind (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)
Ray Stokes (University of Glasgow)
Ann-Kristin Bergquist (Umeå University)

Defendant:
Andreas Richard San Dugstad (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

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