« Back to all events

What future for embedded liberalization?

Dates:
  • Fri 15 Jun 2018 09.45 - 11.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-06-15 9:45 2018-06-15 11:00 Europe/Paris What future for embedded liberalization?

The article develops a new perspective on the dynamics of precarity and socio-economic risk across the most advanced industrial countries. A growing number of people are experiencing heightened risk relating to trends in labor markets, social policy regimes, and in some cases in personal finance. We situate developments in the United States in a broader comparative framework to identify the characteristics it shares with other rich democracies as well as the distinctive ways in which precarity manifests itself in the American context. We argue that the US stands out for the way it combines uncommonly high levels of individual-level exposure to risks of various sorts with low levels of collectively provided insurance to mitigate the impact of these risks. Moreover, we show that the institutions of the American political economy if anything operate to compound risk, actively promoting what we call risk amplification, as misfortune in one arena spreads to foment misfortune in others.

Sala del Capitolo, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Capitolo, Badia Fiesolana

The article develops a new perspective on the dynamics of precarity and socio-economic risk across the most advanced industrial countries. A growing number of people are experiencing heightened risk relating to trends in labor markets, social policy regimes, and in some cases in personal finance. We situate developments in the United States in a broader comparative framework to identify the characteristics it shares with other rich democracies as well as the distinctive ways in which precarity manifests itself in the American context. We argue that the US stands out for the way it combines uncommonly high levels of individual-level exposure to risks of various sorts with low levels of collectively provided insurance to mitigate the impact of these risks. Moreover, we show that the institutions of the American political economy if anything operate to compound risk, actively promoting what we call risk amplification, as misfortune in one arena spreads to foment misfortune in others.


Location:
Sala del Capitolo, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Lecture

Contact:
Gabriella Unger - Send a mail

Speaker:
Ford Professor of Political Science Kathleen Thelen (M.I.T.)
 
 
 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017