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Where have all the Partisans gone?

Dates:
  • Tue 26 Feb 2019 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-02-26 15:00 2019-02-26 17:00 Europe/Paris Where have all the Partisans gone?

Lecture in the framework of the Research Seminar on Gender, Social Action and Politics in European Borderlands, 1880s to the present

This talk focuses on the memorial landscape and on the on-going reinterpretations of the traumatic events of World War II in Slovenia and in its western borderland. The area is part of the European Union and nowadays shared by Slovenia, Croatia and Italy. In the 20th Century it often functioned as a powerful symbolic boundary, one in which several key axes of European and global symbolic geography intersect: the West and the East, German, Latin and Slav Worlds, Europe and the Balkans, fascism and anti-fascism, liberal democracy, capitalism and communism.
During the Second World War Slovenia was divided among Germany, Hungary and Italy, and experienced large-scale massacres by foreign invaders and as a result of extreme internal violence. After the war it annexed parts of former Italian territory but the so-called “Trieste question” soon turned the region into one of the hotspots of the Cold War. Even if the tensions between Italy and Yugoslavia decreased in the next decades, the local Cold War period was characterized by contrasting interpretations of the past. In this view, also the local physical landscape has been affected by contrasting memorials and it became a contemporary site of contestation.
With the aim to overcome dichotomic ideological and ethnic/national explanations, grassroots memory cultures are analyzed. This shows us first, that politics of memory are not a merely imposition of the state in a unilateral top-down direction, and secondly, how state-sponsored initiatives have to negotiate in a border context. Here, Slovenia and the nowadays Italo-Slovene borderland is thus used as a tool to investigate global processes of remembering.

Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

Lecture in the framework of the Research Seminar on Gender, Social Action and Politics in European Borderlands, 1880s to the present

This talk focuses on the memorial landscape and on the on-going reinterpretations of the traumatic events of World War II in Slovenia and in its western borderland. The area is part of the European Union and nowadays shared by Slovenia, Croatia and Italy. In the 20th Century it often functioned as a powerful symbolic boundary, one in which several key axes of European and global symbolic geography intersect: the West and the East, German, Latin and Slav Worlds, Europe and the Balkans, fascism and anti-fascism, liberal democracy, capitalism and communism.
During the Second World War Slovenia was divided among Germany, Hungary and Italy, and experienced large-scale massacres by foreign invaders and as a result of extreme internal violence. After the war it annexed parts of former Italian territory but the so-called “Trieste question” soon turned the region into one of the hotspots of the Cold War. Even if the tensions between Italy and Yugoslavia decreased in the next decades, the local Cold War period was characterized by contrasting interpretations of the past. In this view, also the local physical landscape has been affected by contrasting memorials and it became a contemporary site of contestation.
With the aim to overcome dichotomic ideological and ethnic/national explanations, grassroots memory cultures are analyzed. This shows us first, that politics of memory are not a merely imposition of the state in a unilateral top-down direction, and secondly, how state-sponsored initiatives have to negotiate in a border context. Here, Slovenia and the nowadays Italo-Slovene borderland is thus used as a tool to investigate global processes of remembering.


Location:
Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Lecture

Organiser:
Laura Downs (EUI)
Dominika Gruziel (EUI - Marie Curie Fellow)

Speaker:
Borut Klabjan (EUI - Department of History and Civilization)

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

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