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EUI INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPERIMENTAL WORKING GROUP

Dates:
  • Thu 18 Oct 2018 17.00 - 19.15
  Add to Calendar 2018-10-18 17:00 2018-10-18 19:15 Europe/Paris EUI INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPERIMENTAL WORKING GROUP

“Language and Gender in the Online Recruitment Process”, Emilio J. Castilla (MIT)

Job posting is one of the most widely used recruitment strategies for finding talented candidates, yet little is known about how this key early recruiting process may influence the gender sorting of job seekers into particular jobs. In this article, we move beyond the well-studied effects of the gender typing of jobs and industries to identify and test two distinct (complementary) mechanisms—what we term the gendered language and the in-group preference mechanisms—that may differentially affect how female and male job seekers behave at the initial recruitment phase when jobs are described by recruiters. Using unique data from both a field study (Study 1) and a field experiment study (Study 2) of online job postings, we first investigate the gendered language mechanism by testing whether the specific words recruiters use to advertise otherwise identical jobs to candidates (masculine/feminine words) differently affect female and male job seekers’ interest in applying for such jobs. We then investigate the in-group preference mechanism by testing whether job seekers are more likely to inquire about otherwise identical jobs when the gender of the recruiter is similar to their own. Finally, we examine any potential interaction effects between the gendered language and the in-group preference mechanisms. We conclude by discussing the implications of our study for understanding the role language and employer recruitment efforts play in sustaining gender segregation in today’s labor markets.

“Emotion Processing in Homo and Pan”, Mariska Kret (Leiden University)

Evolution prepared group-living species, (non) human primates included, to quickly recognize and adequately respond to conspecifics’ emotional expressions. Different theories propose that mimicry of emotional expressions facilitates these swift adaptive reactions. When species unconsciously mimic their companions' expressions of emotion, they come to feel reflections of their emotions that influence emotional and empathic behavior. The majority of emotion research has focused on full-blown facial expressions of emotion in humans. However, facial muscles can sometimes be controlled; humans know when to smile, and when not to. Moreover, the fact that emotions are not just expressed by the face alone but by the whole body is often still ignored. In this talk, I therefore argue for a broader exploration of emotion signals from sources beyond the face or face muscles that are more difficult to control. More specifically, I will argue that implicit sources including the whole body and subtle autonomic responses including pupil-dilation are picked up by observers and influence subsequent behavior.

Seminar Room,3rd Floor,V. la Fonte DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room,3rd Floor,V. la Fonte

“Language and Gender in the Online Recruitment Process”, Emilio J. Castilla (MIT)

Job posting is one of the most widely used recruitment strategies for finding talented candidates, yet little is known about how this key early recruiting process may influence the gender sorting of job seekers into particular jobs. In this article, we move beyond the well-studied effects of the gender typing of jobs and industries to identify and test two distinct (complementary) mechanisms—what we term the gendered language and the in-group preference mechanisms—that may differentially affect how female and male job seekers behave at the initial recruitment phase when jobs are described by recruiters. Using unique data from both a field study (Study 1) and a field experiment study (Study 2) of online job postings, we first investigate the gendered language mechanism by testing whether the specific words recruiters use to advertise otherwise identical jobs to candidates (masculine/feminine words) differently affect female and male job seekers’ interest in applying for such jobs. We then investigate the in-group preference mechanism by testing whether job seekers are more likely to inquire about otherwise identical jobs when the gender of the recruiter is similar to their own. Finally, we examine any potential interaction effects between the gendered language and the in-group preference mechanisms. We conclude by discussing the implications of our study for understanding the role language and employer recruitment efforts play in sustaining gender segregation in today’s labor markets.

“Emotion Processing in Homo and Pan”, Mariska Kret (Leiden University)

Evolution prepared group-living species, (non) human primates included, to quickly recognize and adequately respond to conspecifics’ emotional expressions. Different theories propose that mimicry of emotional expressions facilitates these swift adaptive reactions. When species unconsciously mimic their companions' expressions of emotion, they come to feel reflections of their emotions that influence emotional and empathic behavior. The majority of emotion research has focused on full-blown facial expressions of emotion in humans. However, facial muscles can sometimes be controlled; humans know when to smile, and when not to. Moreover, the fact that emotions are not just expressed by the face alone but by the whole body is often still ignored. In this talk, I therefore argue for a broader exploration of emotion signals from sources beyond the face or face muscles that are more difficult to control. More specifically, I will argue that implicit sources including the whole body and subtle autonomic responses including pupil-dilation are picked up by observers and influence subsequent behavior.


Location:
Seminar Room,3rd Floor,V. la Fonte

Affiliation:
Department of Economics
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Rossella Corridori (Eco) - Send a mail

Organiser:
Prof. Klarita Gërxhani (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Prof. Michèle Belot ((EUI - Department of Economics))

Speaker:
Prof. Emilio J. Castilla (MIT Sloan School of Management)
Prof. Mariska Kret (Leiden University)
 
 

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