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Max Weber Fellows June Conference Keynote Lecture - Prof Jürgen Osterhammel (University of Konstanz): Transgressing Boundaries in Space and Time: Remarks on the History of a Global Public Sphere

Dates:
  • Thu 14 Jun 2018 17.00 - 18.30
  Add to Calendar 2018-06-14 17:00 2018-06-14 18:30 Europe/Paris Max Weber Fellows June Conference Keynote Lecture - Prof Jürgen Osterhammel (University of Konstanz): Transgressing Boundaries in Space and Time: Remarks on the History of a Global Public Sphere

Abstract:
There are huge debates going on about global communication in an age of almost unlimited connectivity. They take place in sociology and law, in media studies and globalization theory. The focus of this lecture is more specific and revives the old concept of a "public sphere", suggested by Jürgen Habermas as early as 1962. In what sense is it possible to speak of a global public sphere? And what kind of history may it be said to have?

About the Speaker:
Until his retirement in March 2018, Jürgen Osterhammel was Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Konstanz, Germany. His publications in English include Colonialism: A Theoretical Overview (Marcus Wiener, 1997), Globalization: A Short History (co-authored with Niels P. Petersson, Princeton University Press, 2005); The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century (Princeton University Press, 2014); Decolonization: A Short History (co-authored with Jan C. Jansen, Princeton University Press, 2017); and Unfabling the East: The Enlightenment's Encounter with Asia (Princeton University Press, 2018). With Akira Iriye, he is the editor of a six-volume History of the World, published by Harvard University Press since 2012. His most recent book in German is Die Flughöhe der Adler: Historische Essays zur globalen Gegenwart (C. H. Beck, 2017). He is a recipient of several awards including the Leibniz-Preis (2010) and the Toynbee Prize (2017). In 2017 he was elected a member of the order Pour le Mérite, the highest distinction for the arts and sciences in Germany.

The Lecture will be introduced by Angelo Caglioti (MW Fellow, HEC).

Theatre, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Theatre, Badia Fiesolana

Abstract:
There are huge debates going on about global communication in an age of almost unlimited connectivity. They take place in sociology and law, in media studies and globalization theory. The focus of this lecture is more specific and revives the old concept of a "public sphere", suggested by Jürgen Habermas as early as 1962. In what sense is it possible to speak of a global public sphere? And what kind of history may it be said to have?

About the Speaker:
Until his retirement in March 2018, Jürgen Osterhammel was Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Konstanz, Germany. His publications in English include Colonialism: A Theoretical Overview (Marcus Wiener, 1997), Globalization: A Short History (co-authored with Niels P. Petersson, Princeton University Press, 2005); The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century (Princeton University Press, 2014); Decolonization: A Short History (co-authored with Jan C. Jansen, Princeton University Press, 2017); and Unfabling the East: The Enlightenment's Encounter with Asia (Princeton University Press, 2018). With Akira Iriye, he is the editor of a six-volume History of the World, published by Harvard University Press since 2012. His most recent book in German is Die Flughöhe der Adler: Historische Essays zur globalen Gegenwart (C. H. Beck, 2017). He is a recipient of several awards including the Leibniz-Preis (2010) and the Toynbee Prize (2017). In 2017 he was elected a member of the order Pour le Mérite, the highest distinction for the arts and sciences in Germany.

The Lecture will be introduced by Angelo Caglioti (MW Fellow, HEC).


Location:
Theatre, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Max Weber Programme

Type:
Lecture

Contact:
Francesca Grassini (EUI - Max Weber Programme) - Send a mail

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