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Federica Genovese (University of Essex) gives a talk on "Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Migration Incidents and Media Attitudes in Southern Europe"

Dates:
  • Wed 05 Dec 2018 12.00 - 13.30
  Add to Calendar 2018-12-05 12:00 2018-12-05 13:30 Europe/Paris Federica Genovese (University of Essex) gives a talk on "Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Migration Incidents and Media Attitudes in Southern Europe"

SPS Departmental Seminar Series

Abstract: It is often assumed that the media in developed countries contributes to anxieties that undermine public support for migration from less developed countries. However, we know relatively little about news framing and its effects in relation to the circumstances of immigration. The media may rationally frame immigration stories based on how people immigrate into a country, and under certain conditions they may accentuate the righteousness of inflows and increase empathy for incomers. I argue that emotional attributes of immigration have important implications for the media coverage of migration, and that emotional attributes are magnified by the proximity to the location of transit. I test my argument focusing on sea migration incidents in Southern Europe. A range of evidence supports my claim. New observational data that combines geospatial and demographic information of migrants crossing the Mediterranean between 2000 and 2016 shows that the tone of the reporting media in Greece, Italy and Spain varies systematically with the deadliness and geographic proximity of immigration. Additionally, an original survey experiment fielded in Italy shows that the emotiveness and location of immigration as reported in the media causally affect citizens' attitudes towards immigrants. Cumulatively, the findings have implications for the literature on out-group solidarity and the effect of media on immigration acceptance.

Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana

SPS Departmental Seminar Series

Abstract: It is often assumed that the media in developed countries contributes to anxieties that undermine public support for migration from less developed countries. However, we know relatively little about news framing and its effects in relation to the circumstances of immigration. The media may rationally frame immigration stories based on how people immigrate into a country, and under certain conditions they may accentuate the righteousness of inflows and increase empathy for incomers. I argue that emotional attributes of immigration have important implications for the media coverage of migration, and that emotional attributes are magnified by the proximity to the location of transit. I test my argument focusing on sea migration incidents in Southern Europe. A range of evidence supports my claim. New observational data that combines geospatial and demographic information of migrants crossing the Mediterranean between 2000 and 2016 shows that the tone of the reporting media in Greece, Italy and Spain varies systematically with the deadliness and geographic proximity of immigration. Additionally, an original survey experiment fielded in Italy shows that the emotiveness and location of immigration as reported in the media causally affect citizens' attitudes towards immigrants. Cumulatively, the findings have implications for the literature on out-group solidarity and the effect of media on immigration acceptance.


Location:
Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Seminar series

Discussant:
Dr Federica Genovese (University of Essex)

Organiser:
Professor Elias Dinas (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Contact:
Jennifer Rose Dari (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail
 
 

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