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Europe in the World Research Seminar - Big Data Driven Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice in Europe

Dates:
  • Thu 25 Apr 2019 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-04-25 16:00 2019-04-25 18:00 Europe/Paris Europe in the World Research Seminar - Big Data Driven Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice in Europe

Big data driven surveillance technologies have recently come to the fore as a mechanism capable of revolutionising crime detection, prevention, prosecution and punishment by enabling access to vast amounts of personal life related information and offering new ways of data analysis. In this respect, big data appears to have the potential not only to enhance the operational efficiency of law enforcement and criminal justice authorities, but also to strengthen the understanding of how human rights are affected by criminal procedures. The promise of increased efficiency and reliability, however, is tempered by concerns that the use of big data driven technologies could undermine time-honoured guarantees by triggering a shift from post-crime policing to pro-active measures based on statistics.

Against this backdrop, this presentation has three goals. First, it will conceptualise the use of big data in the field of criminal law and examine the associated risks and benefits. Second, it will place big data driven technologies applied for purposes of law enforcement and criminal justice in the context of European data protection regulation. Third, it will address the question of what happens when fundamental tenets of criminal law become overwhelmed by new technologies – using the example of the right to be presumed innocent – so as to end by initiating a discussion on the substantive and procedural measures needed to ensure access to criminal justice and to protect suspects and defendants in the big data era.

Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Big data driven surveillance technologies have recently come to the fore as a mechanism capable of revolutionising crime detection, prevention, prosecution and punishment by enabling access to vast amounts of personal life related information and offering new ways of data analysis. In this respect, big data appears to have the potential not only to enhance the operational efficiency of law enforcement and criminal justice authorities, but also to strengthen the understanding of how human rights are affected by criminal procedures. The promise of increased efficiency and reliability, however, is tempered by concerns that the use of big data driven technologies could undermine time-honoured guarantees by triggering a shift from post-crime policing to pro-active measures based on statistics.

Against this backdrop, this presentation has three goals. First, it will conceptualise the use of big data in the field of criminal law and examine the associated risks and benefits. Second, it will place big data driven technologies applied for purposes of law enforcement and criminal justice in the context of European data protection regulation. Third, it will address the question of what happens when fundamental tenets of criminal law become overwhelmed by new technologies – using the example of the right to be presumed innocent – so as to end by initiating a discussion on the substantive and procedural measures needed to ensure access to criminal justice and to protect suspects and defendants in the big data era.


Location:
Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies
Department of Political and Social Sciences
Department of History and Civilization
Max Weber Programme

Type:
Research seminar

Organiser:
Professor Ulrich Krotz (EUI - RSCAS and SPS)
Richard Maher (EUI - RSCAS)
Corinna Unger (EUI - HEC)

Speaker:
Athina Sachoulidou (EUI - LAW)

Contact:
Chiara Tarasco (European University Institute) - Send a mail

Links:
Europe in the World Research Area
 
 
 

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