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High Level Policy Dialogue - The Role of National Parliaments in EU Defence Cooperation: Drivers or Brakes toward an Enhanced Common EU Defence Policy?

Dates:
  • Thu 25 Oct 2018 09.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-10-25 9:00 2018-10-25 18:00 Europe/Paris High Level Policy Dialogue - The Role of National Parliaments in EU Defence Cooperation: Drivers or Brakes toward an Enhanced Common EU Defence Policy?

Europe is confronted with enormous security challenges. The 2003 European Security Strategy has traced five different security threats: proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, regional conflicts, terrorism, state failure and organized crime. The 2008 updated version has expanded the threat spectrum: cyber security and energy security were added in the old list. In 2010, the publication of the Internal Security Strategy acknowledges that the majority of threats are cross-border and none member-state can face it alone.

The establishment of Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO) has created an innovative institutional framework for the involvement of member-states in common EU defence projects and, at the same time, has marked a new era regarding the future role of the EU as a leader in the world security arena. In the same vein, the conclusions of the European Council in June 2018 have articulated the need for a stronger role of Europe regarding its own security by reinforcing defence investment, capability development and operational readiness. In addition, they have highlighted the requirement of a close collaboration between the EU and NATO on the basis that PESCO will complement, foster and promote the existing activities of NATO. What is still puzzling is how effective would be this sort of initiatives in the domain of defence. Macron’s ‘European Intervention Initiative’, as was ambitiously declared in his 2017 Sorbonne speech, is another major strategy towards an enhanced common EU defence policy.

The role of National Parliaments in these ongoing political debates and formulations about EU defence cooperation is crucial. Are National Parliaments engaged in the preparations of EU defence projects? What are the past and present practices? What kind of expectations have been formulated for inter-parliamentary cooperation across Europe and what is the role of the European Parliament in these initiatives in collaboration with the National Parliaments? Are National Parliaments and/or the European Parliament necessary for the legitimacy of the EU action? Could National Parliaments act as an active engine or do function more as a brake towards an enhanced common EU defence policy?

Understanding the opportunities and challenges posed by the new defence initiatives for the National Parliaments at the EU level and the perspectives for inter-parliamentary cooperation in this context is essential. In this respect, the aim of the high-level policy dialogue organised by the School of Transnational Governance is to bring together academics, policy-makers, officials and members of civil society in order to discuss and exchange views concerning the new defence cooperation developments at the EU level, its implications for Europe and its member-states and for the broader transformation of transnational governance.

Attendance at the event is by invitation only and takes place under Chatham House rules.

Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Europe is confronted with enormous security challenges. The 2003 European Security Strategy has traced five different security threats: proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, regional conflicts, terrorism, state failure and organized crime. The 2008 updated version has expanded the threat spectrum: cyber security and energy security were added in the old list. In 2010, the publication of the Internal Security Strategy acknowledges that the majority of threats are cross-border and none member-state can face it alone.

The establishment of Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO) has created an innovative institutional framework for the involvement of member-states in common EU defence projects and, at the same time, has marked a new era regarding the future role of the EU as a leader in the world security arena. In the same vein, the conclusions of the European Council in June 2018 have articulated the need for a stronger role of Europe regarding its own security by reinforcing defence investment, capability development and operational readiness. In addition, they have highlighted the requirement of a close collaboration between the EU and NATO on the basis that PESCO will complement, foster and promote the existing activities of NATO. What is still puzzling is how effective would be this sort of initiatives in the domain of defence. Macron’s ‘European Intervention Initiative’, as was ambitiously declared in his 2017 Sorbonne speech, is another major strategy towards an enhanced common EU defence policy.

The role of National Parliaments in these ongoing political debates and formulations about EU defence cooperation is crucial. Are National Parliaments engaged in the preparations of EU defence projects? What are the past and present practices? What kind of expectations have been formulated for inter-parliamentary cooperation across Europe and what is the role of the European Parliament in these initiatives in collaboration with the National Parliaments? Are National Parliaments and/or the European Parliament necessary for the legitimacy of the EU action? Could National Parliaments act as an active engine or do function more as a brake towards an enhanced common EU defence policy?

Understanding the opportunities and challenges posed by the new defence initiatives for the National Parliaments at the EU level and the perspectives for inter-parliamentary cooperation in this context is essential. In this respect, the aim of the high-level policy dialogue organised by the School of Transnational Governance is to bring together academics, policy-makers, officials and members of civil society in order to discuss and exchange views concerning the new defence cooperation developments at the EU level, its implications for Europe and its member-states and for the broader transformation of transnational governance.

Attendance at the event is by invitation only and takes place under Chatham House rules.


Location:
Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia

Affiliation:
School of Transnational Governance

Type:
Special event

Contact:
Fiona Wong (EUI) - Send a mail

Links:
The State of Security in Europe: Public Keynote speech by Javier Solana
 
 

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Page last updated on 18 August 2017