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Prospects of future mobility and preferences on education spending (Political Behaviour Colloquium, S. Hunger & V. Valentim)

Dates:
  • Tue 27 Nov 2018 17.15 - 19.00
  Add to Calendar 2018-11-27 17:15 2018-11-27 19:00 Europe/Paris Prospects of future mobility and preferences on education spending (Political Behaviour Colloquium, S. Hunger & V. Valentim)

The literature has shown that income has a positive effect on individual preferences on education spending, arguably, also prospected income could be expected to influence individuals’ attitudes. In this regard, the literature on the “Prospects of upward mobility” (POUM) has shown that future prospected income, affects preferences on income redistribution. Building on these assumptions, I argue that poor individuals that expect upward mobility would support more education spending than individuals that expect to remain poor. Conversely, individuals in the middle class or rich that expect downward mobility would support less spending on education than individuals that predict stability of income. For the empirical analysis, I employ data from the “Life in Transition III” (LITSIII) on 34 countries. The results show that the upward mobile poor support more education spending than the poor, whereas the downward mobile middle class or rich do not shift their preferences compared to the stable middle class and rich.

Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana

The literature has shown that income has a positive effect on individual preferences on education spending, arguably, also prospected income could be expected to influence individuals’ attitudes. In this regard, the literature on the “Prospects of upward mobility” (POUM) has shown that future prospected income, affects preferences on income redistribution. Building on these assumptions, I argue that poor individuals that expect upward mobility would support more education spending than individuals that expect to remain poor. Conversely, individuals in the middle class or rich that expect downward mobility would support less spending on education than individuals that predict stability of income. For the empirical analysis, I employ data from the “Life in Transition III” (LITSIII) on 34 countries. The results show that the upward mobile poor support more education spending than the poor, whereas the downward mobile middle class or rich do not shift their preferences compared to the stable middle class and rich.


Location:
Seminar Room 2, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Sophia Hunger - Send a mail

Organiser:
Sophia Hunger
Valentim Vicente

Speaker:
Risto Conte Keivabu
 
 

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