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The Challenge of Three-Dimensional Printing: Questioning Established Concepts in Intellectual Property Law

Dates:
  • Wed 09 Jan 2019 10.00 - 12.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-01-09 10:00 2019-01-09 12:00 Europe/Paris The Challenge of Three-Dimensional Printing: Questioning Established Concepts in Intellectual Property Law

Over the last years, academics, practitioners and policy makers have focused their attention on an emerging technology: three-dimensional printing (“3DP”).
3DP is often portrayed as a game changer, showing the potential to disrupt established socioeconomic paradigms and exert profound implications in disparate areas of law.
3DP not only is well integrated in the manufacturing industry, but also increasingly adopted at consumer level. Recent developments have made it possible for ordinary people to take an active role in the production, customization and distribution of goods, and likewise paved the way for the proliferation of new market entrants, such as 3DP online platforms.
Against this background, this thesis aims to shed some light on the implications that 3DP may have for Intellectual Property Law. In particular, this work attempts to predict and grasp the consequences that the digitization of real world things may carry in the area of IP law, both from the side of protection and infringement.
This contribution is intended to create general awareness about the current state of the art and likewise delineate possible future scenarios in the 3DP ecosystem.
The research question at the core of the analysis is whether the current legal framework of different IPRs already offers suitable means for regulating the thin dividing line between the digital and the analogue world, or rather needs to be amended, in order to cope with such a fascinating reality.
To this end, the analysis contributes insights to the best legal treatment that CAD files shall receive, in case such files embed products protected by copyright, designs, patents and trademarks. Hence, it addresses right owners’ concern that the online transmission of CAD files, combined with the ease of converting such files into the final printout, will facilitate mass-scale and worldwide infringement of all IPRs.

Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

Over the last years, academics, practitioners and policy makers have focused their attention on an emerging technology: three-dimensional printing (“3DP”).
3DP is often portrayed as a game changer, showing the potential to disrupt established socioeconomic paradigms and exert profound implications in disparate areas of law.
3DP not only is well integrated in the manufacturing industry, but also increasingly adopted at consumer level. Recent developments have made it possible for ordinary people to take an active role in the production, customization and distribution of goods, and likewise paved the way for the proliferation of new market entrants, such as 3DP online platforms.
Against this background, this thesis aims to shed some light on the implications that 3DP may have for Intellectual Property Law. In particular, this work attempts to predict and grasp the consequences that the digitization of real world things may carry in the area of IP law, both from the side of protection and infringement.
This contribution is intended to create general awareness about the current state of the art and likewise delineate possible future scenarios in the 3DP ecosystem.
The research question at the core of the analysis is whether the current legal framework of different IPRs already offers suitable means for regulating the thin dividing line between the digital and the analogue world, or rather needs to be amended, in order to cope with such a fascinating reality.
To this end, the analysis contributes insights to the best legal treatment that CAD files shall receive, in case such files embed products protected by copyright, designs, patents and trademarks. Hence, it addresses right owners’ concern that the online transmission of CAD files, combined with the ease of converting such files into the final printout, will facilitate mass-scale and worldwide infringement of all IPRs.


Location:
Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Thesis defence

Defendant:
Viola Elam (EUI - Law)

Supervisor:
Prof. Giovanni Sartor (EUI - Law Department)

Co-supervisor:
Jane Ginsburg (Columbia Law School)

Examiner:
Drahos Peter
Raquel Xalabarder (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

Contact:
Helene Debuire Franchini - Send a mail
 
 

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