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Political Theory of the EU

Dates:
  • Tue 05 Feb 2019 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-02-05 15:00 2019-02-05 17:00 Europe/Paris Political Theory of the EU

Publics across Europe increasingly not only feel that the EU is distant, condescending, and technocratic but also that it undermines the problem-solving capacities of its member states and increases inequality both within and across them. The EU strikes many, as a result, as both socially unjust and democratically illegitimate. This raises various questions: What principles of legitimacy should guide our judgment in assessing such commonly avowed views? Should the EU be assessed according to the same standards of legitimacy as the state? And: What principles of socio-economic justice, if any, should apply at the EU level? What would a Europe that promotes rather than undermines social justice look like? How should we conceive of the relation of justice and legitimacy at the EU level?

The seminar is grouped into three parts. The first part asks whether the EU is legitimate; the second whether it is just; and third whether (and why) free movement is worth preserving. Each part begins by exploring the normative foundations of legitimacy, justice, and free movement, respectively, and then goes on to assess their implications for the EU. Topics discussed (from a normative perspective) include: the democratic deficit, the impact of the single market on welfare states, eurozone reform, EU social policy, EU citizenship, refugee policy, and the EU’s impact on the rule of law in an era of populism.

The seminar will provide students with a solid grasp of the normative foundations of some of the most hotly contested questions in current debates on the European Union, and a set of tools for providing their own answers to them.

Seminar Room 1, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 1, Badia Fiesolana

Publics across Europe increasingly not only feel that the EU is distant, condescending, and technocratic but also that it undermines the problem-solving capacities of its member states and increases inequality both within and across them. The EU strikes many, as a result, as both socially unjust and democratically illegitimate. This raises various questions: What principles of legitimacy should guide our judgment in assessing such commonly avowed views? Should the EU be assessed according to the same standards of legitimacy as the state? And: What principles of socio-economic justice, if any, should apply at the EU level? What would a Europe that promotes rather than undermines social justice look like? How should we conceive of the relation of justice and legitimacy at the EU level?

The seminar is grouped into three parts. The first part asks whether the EU is legitimate; the second whether it is just; and third whether (and why) free movement is worth preserving. Each part begins by exploring the normative foundations of legitimacy, justice, and free movement, respectively, and then goes on to assess their implications for the EU. Topics discussed (from a normative perspective) include: the democratic deficit, the impact of the single market on welfare states, eurozone reform, EU social policy, EU citizenship, refugee policy, and the EU’s impact on the rule of law in an era of populism.

The seminar will provide students with a solid grasp of the normative foundations of some of the most hotly contested questions in current debates on the European Union, and a set of tools for providing their own answers to them.


Location:
Seminar Room 1, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Seminar

Contact:
Adele Ines Battistini (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Speaker:
Prof. Andrea Sangiovanni (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Attachment:
Syllabus
 
 

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