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Non-Alignment as an alternative vision to the superpower Cold War

Dates:
  • Wed 20 Feb 2019 14.30 - 16.30
  Add to Calendar 2019-02-20 14:30 2019-02-20 16:30 Europe/Paris Non-Alignment as an alternative vision to the superpower Cold War

In the framework of the HEC Coloquium

Numerous misconceptions about Non-Aligned Movement circulate to this day, mostly notably its conflation with Asian-African internationalism. This confusion mostly stems from the overlapping programs and memberships, but also from Nehru’s unsuccessful attempt to impose his rigid definition of non-alignment on the Asian-African Conference in Bandung in 1955. Moreover, the early Non-Aligned Movement endorsed Bandung’s Ten Principles at its 1st conference in Belgrade in 1961. In reality, Asian-African internationalism focuses on geography and anti-imperialism, and Non-Alignment was based on bloc-free status in the Cold War. Many participants from the Bandung Conference were automatically excluded from the sibling movement because they were aligned. By the 1960s, the two movements also ended up following opposite trajectories even if both had roots in Nehruvian thinking. Early in that decade, the often conflated siblings became vicious rivals for allegiance in the emerging Global South. But after the demise of Asian-African internationalism, the Non-Aligned Movement remained internally split, and then tended to tilt towards the Socialist Camp during the June War in 1967 and the Indochina conflict in the early 1970s. Eventually, the national interests of India and Egypt, which both had lost their Non-Aligned founding fathers Nehru and Nasser, respectively, undermined the movement even more.

Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

In the framework of the HEC Coloquium

Numerous misconceptions about Non-Aligned Movement circulate to this day, mostly notably its conflation with Asian-African internationalism. This confusion mostly stems from the overlapping programs and memberships, but also from Nehru’s unsuccessful attempt to impose his rigid definition of non-alignment on the Asian-African Conference in Bandung in 1955. Moreover, the early Non-Aligned Movement endorsed Bandung’s Ten Principles at its 1st conference in Belgrade in 1961. In reality, Asian-African internationalism focuses on geography and anti-imperialism, and Non-Alignment was based on bloc-free status in the Cold War. Many participants from the Bandung Conference were automatically excluded from the sibling movement because they were aligned. By the 1960s, the two movements also ended up following opposite trajectories even if both had roots in Nehruvian thinking. Early in that decade, the often conflated siblings became vicious rivals for allegiance in the emerging Global South. But after the demise of Asian-African internationalism, the Non-Aligned Movement remained internally split, and then tended to tilt towards the Socialist Camp during the June War in 1967 and the Indochina conflict in the early 1970s. Eventually, the national interests of India and Egypt, which both had lost their Non-Aligned founding fathers Nehru and Nasser, respectively, undermined the movement even more.


Location:
Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies
School of Transnational Governance
Max Weber Programme

Type:
Lecture

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Organiser:
Jorge Flores (European University Institute)
Stephane Van Damme (European University Institute)

Speaker:
Lorenz Luthi (Fernand Braudel Fellow/McGill University)

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