« Back to all events

A Passage to Europe. The Moral Economy of Cross-cultural Travel during the Age of Revolutions

Dates:
  • Wed 20 Mar 2019 14.30 - 16.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-03-20 14:30 2019-03-20 16:00 Europe/Paris A Passage to Europe. The Moral Economy of Cross-cultural Travel during the Age of Revolutions

In the framework of the HEC Department Colloquium

In 1772, the East India Company brutally conquered the city of Broach (Bharuch) in Gujarat. About twenty years later, three sons of the deposed nawab left for London accompanied by a small suite. Their plan was to bypass the Bombay presidency and appeal to the Court of Directors for redress. After they had crossed the Ottoman Empire by way of Basra, Bagdad and Istanbul, they set sail for Europe. The elder brother, Nawazish Khan, landed in Marseilles in the spring of 1793 along with his companion Ahmad Khan. Another brother, Wahid al-Din Khan, reached Toulon a few weeks later.

What networks did the travelers rely on in order to circumvent the Bombay authorities? How did they interact with the French authorities and claim hospitality? How, in the process, did they negotiate their identities? And what, in the end, did they achieve? This talk will endeavor to answer these questions by considering them through the lens of what I suggest calling the “moral economy” of cross-cultural travel. I will try to define this as consisting in the interplay between the travelers’ claims to financial aid and the obligations local authorities felt bound to. Central to this interplay were, I shall demonstrate, the go-betweens who translated and vouched for the travelers’ stories.

Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati

In the framework of the HEC Department Colloquium

In 1772, the East India Company brutally conquered the city of Broach (Bharuch) in Gujarat. About twenty years later, three sons of the deposed nawab left for London accompanied by a small suite. Their plan was to bypass the Bombay presidency and appeal to the Court of Directors for redress. After they had crossed the Ottoman Empire by way of Basra, Bagdad and Istanbul, they set sail for Europe. The elder brother, Nawazish Khan, landed in Marseilles in the spring of 1793 along with his companion Ahmad Khan. Another brother, Wahid al-Din Khan, reached Toulon a few weeks later.

What networks did the travelers rely on in order to circumvent the Bombay authorities? How did they interact with the French authorities and claim hospitality? How, in the process, did they negotiate their identities? And what, in the end, did they achieve? This talk will endeavor to answer these questions by considering them through the lens of what I suggest calling the “moral economy” of cross-cultural travel. I will try to define this as consisting in the interplay between the travelers’ claims to financial aid and the obligations local authorities felt bound to. Central to this interplay were, I shall demonstrate, the go-betweens who translated and vouched for the travelers’ stories.


Location:
Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Lecture

Organiser:
Jorge Flores (European University Institute)
Stephane Van Damme (European University Institute)

Speaker:
Rahul Markovits (École Normale Superieur, Paris and Fernand Braudel Fellow, EUI)

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Attachment:
Privacy statement
 
 

Similar events

 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017