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EUI Interdisciplinary Experimental Working Group (ECO/SPS)

Dates:
  • Thu 21 Feb 2019 14.30 - 16.45
  Add to Calendar 2019-02-21 14:30 2019-02-21 16:45 Europe/Paris EUI Interdisciplinary Experimental Working Group (ECO/SPS)

Prof. Gunn Elizabeth Birkelund (University of Oslo)

“Do employers discriminate by gender?
Evidence from six comparative cross-national harmonized field experiments”

In this paper we provide evidence from the first comparable cross-national field experiment on gender discrimination in hiring processes. Financed by Horizon2020, we have conducted comparative randomized field experiments of hiring discrimination in the US and five European countries: Germany, Netherlands, Norway, UK and Spain. These countries vary in terms of their welfare state arrangements, labor market policies and, as people’s attitudes to gender roles and female labor force participation. The field-experimental data allow us to explore employers’ responses to job applications from equally qualified young men and women from the majority population within each of the six countries. We have included occupations requiring high school up to lower university level education, and sent applications to publicly announced vacancies in the following occupations: cooks, sales representatives, receptionists, payroll clerks, store workers and software developers.
Our main finding is that we do not find strong evidence of gender discrimination in any country. Second, where we do find evidence of discrimination, it is young men, not young women, that experience lower callbacks from employers. We found discrimination against young men three of the six occupations, all female dominated occupations.

Prof. Joep Sonnemans (University of Amsterdam)

"Social Preference Reversals"
Michalis Drouvelis, Giorgia Romagnoli and Joep Sonnemans

Preference reversals are well documented in individual decision making under risk. Common explanations postulate that reversals may stem from changes across choice frameworks on what constitute the most salient traits of the decision problem. We explore the presence of reversals in a different context: social preference decisions (under certainty). We elicit preferences over distributions of money between Self and Other with two methods: evaluations and binary choices. In the evaluation we ask for the equal distribution that is as good as the distribution under consideration. In the choice task we let participants choose between distributions that have similar evaluations. These two methods can shift attention and salience across different aspects of the distributions, such as fairness, efficiency and own-payoff maximization.
We find systematic preference reversals. Fairness considerations seem to be more important in the evaluation framework compared to when a choice is made between two unfair distributions. We speculate that the evaluation framework makes fair outcomes available and fairness more salient as a result. In addition, the preference ordering obtained from valuations seem to be noisier than the one obtained from binary choices.


Conference Room, Villa la Fonte DD/MM/YYYY
  Conference Room, Villa la Fonte

Prof. Gunn Elizabeth Birkelund (University of Oslo)

“Do employers discriminate by gender?
Evidence from six comparative cross-national harmonized field experiments”

In this paper we provide evidence from the first comparable cross-national field experiment on gender discrimination in hiring processes. Financed by Horizon2020, we have conducted comparative randomized field experiments of hiring discrimination in the US and five European countries: Germany, Netherlands, Norway, UK and Spain. These countries vary in terms of their welfare state arrangements, labor market policies and, as people’s attitudes to gender roles and female labor force participation. The field-experimental data allow us to explore employers’ responses to job applications from equally qualified young men and women from the majority population within each of the six countries. We have included occupations requiring high school up to lower university level education, and sent applications to publicly announced vacancies in the following occupations: cooks, sales representatives, receptionists, payroll clerks, store workers and software developers.
Our main finding is that we do not find strong evidence of gender discrimination in any country. Second, where we do find evidence of discrimination, it is young men, not young women, that experience lower callbacks from employers. We found discrimination against young men three of the six occupations, all female dominated occupations.

Prof. Joep Sonnemans (University of Amsterdam)

"Social Preference Reversals"
Michalis Drouvelis, Giorgia Romagnoli and Joep Sonnemans

Preference reversals are well documented in individual decision making under risk. Common explanations postulate that reversals may stem from changes across choice frameworks on what constitute the most salient traits of the decision problem. We explore the presence of reversals in a different context: social preference decisions (under certainty). We elicit preferences over distributions of money between Self and Other with two methods: evaluations and binary choices. In the evaluation we ask for the equal distribution that is as good as the distribution under consideration. In the choice task we let participants choose between distributions that have similar evaluations. These two methods can shift attention and salience across different aspects of the distributions, such as fairness, efficiency and own-payoff maximization.
We find systematic preference reversals. Fairness considerations seem to be more important in the evaluation framework compared to when a choice is made between two unfair distributions. We speculate that the evaluation framework makes fair outcomes available and fairness more salient as a result. In addition, the preference ordering obtained from valuations seem to be noisier than the one obtained from binary choices.



Location:
Conference Room, Villa la Fonte

Affiliation:
Department of Economics
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Workshop

Organiser:
Prof. Klarita Gërxhani (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)
Prof. Michèle Belot ((EUI - Department of Economics))

Speaker:
Prof. Birkelund Gunn Elisabeth (University of Oslo)
Prof. Joep Sonnemans (University of Amsterdam)

Contact:
Rossella Corridori (Eco) - Send a mail
 
 

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