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Birth intentions and other life goals: complementarity or competition?

Dates:
  • Thu 07 Feb 2019 13.00 - 15.30
  Add to Calendar 2019-02-07 13:00 2019-02-07 15:30 Europe/Paris Birth intentions and other life goals: complementarity or competition?

Paper presentation within the Inequality Working Group

In European and other advanced societies people tend to have fewer children than they tell they would like to have. In previous research on this topic the correspondence between childbearing plans and outcomes had generally been investigated in isolation from choices and events in other life course domains. This project tackles this central issue in an innovative way by acknowledging the gap between intended and realised fertility in the unified framework of individual life course. Using new cross-country comparative and longitudinal data (Generation and Gender Program (GGP) for several countries), I will investigate the interdependencies between intentions and outcomes in reproduction, education, partnership, work, and residence. The project aims to disentangle the correlation structure across individuals’ simultaneous life goals (or intentions), individuals’ subsequent behaviours (or outcomes), individual’s links between intentions and outcomes. Preliminary results show that adults do often have multidimensional plans and that the chance to get a child decreases to the increasing number of the other life course plans. Complementarity or competition of other life course intentions is gendered. Planning to move in a new dwelling is functional to the realization of birth intentions if expressed by men while planning to change job or to resume studies delay or hinder childbearing if they are expressed by women. Finally, having a cohabiting relationship is a pre-condition for the realization of birth intentions of both men and women. The findings provide a new interpretation of the gap between intended and actual fertility and a new explanation of the fact that birth intentions remain often unrealised.

Seminar Room 3, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 3, Badia Fiesolana

Paper presentation within the Inequality Working Group

In European and other advanced societies people tend to have fewer children than they tell they would like to have. In previous research on this topic the correspondence between childbearing plans and outcomes had generally been investigated in isolation from choices and events in other life course domains. This project tackles this central issue in an innovative way by acknowledging the gap between intended and realised fertility in the unified framework of individual life course. Using new cross-country comparative and longitudinal data (Generation and Gender Program (GGP) for several countries), I will investigate the interdependencies between intentions and outcomes in reproduction, education, partnership, work, and residence. The project aims to disentangle the correlation structure across individuals’ simultaneous life goals (or intentions), individuals’ subsequent behaviours (or outcomes), individual’s links between intentions and outcomes. Preliminary results show that adults do often have multidimensional plans and that the chance to get a child decreases to the increasing number of the other life course plans. Complementarity or competition of other life course intentions is gendered. Planning to move in a new dwelling is functional to the realization of birth intentions if expressed by men while planning to change job or to resume studies delay or hinder childbearing if they are expressed by women. Finally, having a cohabiting relationship is a pre-condition for the realization of birth intentions of both men and women. The findings provide a new interpretation of the gap between intended and actual fertility and a new explanation of the fact that birth intentions remain often unrealised.


Location:
Seminar Room 3, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Organiser:
Prof. Juho Härkönen
Prof. Fabrizio Bernardi

Speaker:
Maria Rita Testa (Wittgenstein Center)

Contact:
Monika Rzemieniecka (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail
 
 

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