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MW Occasional Lecture with Prof. Catherine Lu (McGill University) - Decolonizing Self-determination

Dates:
  • Wed 06 Feb 2019 17.00 - 18.30
  Add to Calendar 2019-02-06 17:00 2019-02-06 18:30 Europe/Paris MW Occasional Lecture with Prof. Catherine Lu (McGill University) - Decolonizing Self-determination

Jointly with the Legal and Political Philosophy Working Group.

This talk examines what decolonization may entail with regard to formulating the concept and principle of self-determination as a component of global justice, and the implications for international and transnational order. The 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) extends the decolonization process started in the 1960s to indigenous peoples, recognizing a right to indigenous self-determination. This extension is not as straightforward as it appears, and I argue that the self-determination claims of indigenous peoples force us to rethink the traditional prerogatives of a state’s jurisdictional authority and territorial rights, deriving from considerations of both justice and reconciliation. First, if self-determination is constitutive of political justice, then the self-determination of indigenous peoples requires making international state boundaries more porous, in order to develop a states system that facilitates rather than hinders the legitimate self-determination claims of substate transnational and transboundary agents. An international order that facilitates indigenous self-determination in these respects is one that is more basically just than one that does not. Second, if existential alienation is the legacy of acts and practices of genocide, dispossession, and cultural destruction that have marked the interaction of indigenous peoples with the modern interstate order, overcoming such existential alienation requires the states system to accommodate the self-determination claims of indigenous peoples in ways that do not reproduce conditions of alienated agency. The good of nonalienation is an essential supporting condition for indigenous peoples to engage meaningfully in struggles for justice and reconciliation in modern conditions.

Eniola Soyemi (MW SPS Fellow) will introduce and chair the Lecture.

Emeroteca, Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Emeroteca, Badia Fiesolana

Jointly with the Legal and Political Philosophy Working Group.

This talk examines what decolonization may entail with regard to formulating the concept and principle of self-determination as a component of global justice, and the implications for international and transnational order. The 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) extends the decolonization process started in the 1960s to indigenous peoples, recognizing a right to indigenous self-determination. This extension is not as straightforward as it appears, and I argue that the self-determination claims of indigenous peoples force us to rethink the traditional prerogatives of a state’s jurisdictional authority and territorial rights, deriving from considerations of both justice and reconciliation. First, if self-determination is constitutive of political justice, then the self-determination of indigenous peoples requires making international state boundaries more porous, in order to develop a states system that facilitates rather than hinders the legitimate self-determination claims of substate transnational and transboundary agents. An international order that facilitates indigenous self-determination in these respects is one that is more basically just than one that does not. Second, if existential alienation is the legacy of acts and practices of genocide, dispossession, and cultural destruction that have marked the interaction of indigenous peoples with the modern interstate order, overcoming such existential alienation requires the states system to accommodate the self-determination claims of indigenous peoples in ways that do not reproduce conditions of alienated agency. The good of nonalienation is an essential supporting condition for indigenous peoples to engage meaningfully in struggles for justice and reconciliation in modern conditions.

Eniola Soyemi (MW SPS Fellow) will introduce and chair the Lecture.


Location:
Emeroteca, Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Max Weber Programme

Type:
Lecture

Contact:
Francesca Grassini (EUI - Max Weber Programme) - Send a mail

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