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Beyond Access to Justice: An exploration of large firm pro bono practice across Europe

Dates:
  • Fri 24 May 2019 16.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-05-24 16:00 2019-05-24 18:00 Europe/Paris Beyond Access to Justice: An exploration of large firm pro bono practice across Europe

This PhD thesis explores pro bono practice among large, international law firms in Europe. The central question addressed by the thesis is: does Big Law Pro Bono contribute to access to justice in Europe? The thesis commences with a review of the literature which both contextualizes and situates the thesis. This review also identifies gaps in the existing literature particularly related to the globalization and localization of law firm pro bono and its practice beyond the United States. After identifying issues with the current definition of access to justice, used throughout much of the existing literature, the thesis proposes a new definition which is then used throughout the thesis to evaluate pro bono practice in Europe. Towards this end, the thesis first provides historical context to law firm pro bono practice by exploring the history of pro bono, legal aid and other models of progressive lawyering across Europe. Following this, the thesis closely explores the process by which large firm pro bono practice arrived in Europe (i.e. globalization), the contemporary practice and the process by which it adapted to the European legal, social and political ecosystem (i.e. localization). Ultimately, it is suggested that large firm pro bono does not contribute to access to justice in Europe insofar as access to justice is defined narrowly - in the way that it has been conceived of in much of the existing literature. However, by embracing a broader definition of access to justice, it is possible to perceive the actual (and possible) social and political impact of large firm pro bono practice in Europe.

Sala dei Levrieri - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala dei Levrieri - Villa Salviati- Castle

This PhD thesis explores pro bono practice among large, international law firms in Europe. The central question addressed by the thesis is: does Big Law Pro Bono contribute to access to justice in Europe? The thesis commences with a review of the literature which both contextualizes and situates the thesis. This review also identifies gaps in the existing literature particularly related to the globalization and localization of law firm pro bono and its practice beyond the United States. After identifying issues with the current definition of access to justice, used throughout much of the existing literature, the thesis proposes a new definition which is then used throughout the thesis to evaluate pro bono practice in Europe. Towards this end, the thesis first provides historical context to law firm pro bono practice by exploring the history of pro bono, legal aid and other models of progressive lawyering across Europe. Following this, the thesis closely explores the process by which large firm pro bono practice arrived in Europe (i.e. globalization), the contemporary practice and the process by which it adapted to the European legal, social and political ecosystem (i.e. localization). Ultimately, it is suggested that large firm pro bono does not contribute to access to justice in Europe insofar as access to justice is defined narrowly - in the way that it has been conceived of in much of the existing literature. However, by embracing a broader definition of access to justice, it is possible to perceive the actual (and possible) social and political impact of large firm pro bono practice in Europe.


Location:
Sala dei Levrieri - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Thesis defence

Supervisor:
Prof. Claire Kilpatrick (EUI - Law Department)

Defendant:
Lamin Khadar (EUI - Law)

Examiner:
Prof. Louise G. TRUBEK (University of Wisconsin Law School)
Scott Cummings (UCLA)

Contact:
Helene Debuire Franchini - Send a mail

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