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The World Bank's Lawyers - An Inquiry into the Life of Law as Institutional Practice

Dates:
  • Fri 27 Sep 2019 15.30 - 17.30
  Add to Calendar 2019-09-27 15:30 2019-09-27 17:30 Europe/Paris The World Bank's Lawyers - An Inquiry into the Life of Law as Institutional Practice

In the landscape of global governance, international institutions have emerged as productive sites for the incubation, circulation and mediation of international law. Legal labor and imagination have often appeared as essential to the manner in which the powers of these potent actors are rationalized or legitimized and to the ways in which their (reformist, operational, political or epistemic) practices are conceptualized, enacted or – occasionally and increasingly – contested. International law, as both a domain of legal knowledge and a (variable) set of material practices, thereby produces artefacts and value objects that perform pivotal roles in international institutional life. Yet, the academic field of international institutional law – marked by a doctrinal and normative inclination – has traditionally underplayed (or ignored) the constitutive importance of legal practices and the performative effects these engender in concrete institutional spaces. The vector of intellectual engagement in this domain of scholarship, in other words, has traditionally pointed towards abstraction, comparison or aspiration.
In contrast – drawing on a largely unexplored archive and a Latourian methodological apparatus –
this dissertation provides an original empirical account of the evolution in legal thinking and practice inside one specific organization at the heart of global governance: the World Bank (the ‘Bank’).

Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

In the landscape of global governance, international institutions have emerged as productive sites for the incubation, circulation and mediation of international law. Legal labor and imagination have often appeared as essential to the manner in which the powers of these potent actors are rationalized or legitimized and to the ways in which their (reformist, operational, political or epistemic) practices are conceptualized, enacted or – occasionally and increasingly – contested. International law, as both a domain of legal knowledge and a (variable) set of material practices, thereby produces artefacts and value objects that perform pivotal roles in international institutional life. Yet, the academic field of international institutional law – marked by a doctrinal and normative inclination – has traditionally underplayed (or ignored) the constitutive importance of legal practices and the performative effects these engender in concrete institutional spaces. The vector of intellectual engagement in this domain of scholarship, in other words, has traditionally pointed towards abstraction, comparison or aspiration.
In contrast – drawing on a largely unexplored archive and a Latourian methodological apparatus –
this dissertation provides an original empirical account of the evolution in legal thinking and practice inside one specific organization at the heart of global governance: the World Bank (the ‘Bank’).


Location:
Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Thesis defence

Examiner:
Prof. Claire Kilpatrick (EUI - Law Department)
Professor Benedict Kingsbury (New York University School of Law)
Guy Fiti Sinclair (Victoria University Wellington)

Supervisor:
Prof. Nehal Bhuta (EUI - Department of Law)

Defendant:
Dimitri Van Den Meerssche (EUI - Law)

Contact:
Helene Debuire Franchini - Send a mail
 
 

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