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High Level Policy Dialogue | Migration Governance: A Common Approach?

Dates:
  • Tue 21 May 2019 09.00 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-05-21 9:00 2019-05-21 18:00 Europe/Paris High Level Policy Dialogue | Migration Governance: A Common Approach?

In a rapidly evolving, volatile and heterogeneous governance environment, it seems inescapable that ambitious global agreements on legally binding rules supported by new, universal institutions are improbable. Global governance must instead rely on the web of existing rules and institutions inherited from the previous decades and on softer, more ad hoc forms of collective action. At the same time, this architecture of global economic and financial governance is increasingly at odds with the shape and intensity of interdependence. Hence what is required is flexibility and new solutions using the resources at hand, while preserving the legitimacy of universal rules and institutions which have underpinned the global system for decades. Existing institutions in this respect should be requested to serve collective action beyond the confines of their original remit. Methods need to change as well: many collective action problems can be tackled by cooperation techniques that do not curtail national sovereignty, which actively engage epistemic communities, subnational governments and civil society, or which are based in the voluntary formation of sectoral, regional or development level-based coalitions. Within this broad governance context, the migration governance landscape presents its own unique problems. Migration has historically been regarded as a matter for national decision-making, with the significant exception of the protection of refugees, for which a global regime was defined after World War 2. Nevertheless, increasing cross-border flows as a consequence of economic integration, demographic pressure and climate change have squarely positioned it in the policy space requiring collective action, and highlighted the need for common principles. Migration as a policy issue has become explosively divisive, while migration governance is today a bewilderingly complex and fragmented tapestry of overlapping, parallel, nested and tangential institutions and processes. These depend largely on what aspect of migration is being dealt with, and at what level. Each of the three regimes which can be distinguished (the protection regime, the travel regime, and the labour migration regime) is dealt with differently, at different levels of governance, through instruments and processes with varying levels of constraint. In this context, this high-level policy dialogue attempts to decipher the main elements of the migration governance landscape and address three key issues in the ongoing debate: labour mobility and skills; the Global Compact; and migration governance in the EU. The event is part of the two-year research project on the Transformation of Global Governance (more details at tgg.eui.eu). The Policy Dialogue will bring together a small number of senior policymakers, recognised experts and key participants from industry and civil society. Attendance at the event is by invitation only and takes place under Chatham House rules.

Sala del Capitolo DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Capitolo

In a rapidly evolving, volatile and heterogeneous governance environment, it seems inescapable that ambitious global agreements on legally binding rules supported by new, universal institutions are improbable. Global governance must instead rely on the web of existing rules and institutions inherited from the previous decades and on softer, more ad hoc forms of collective action. At the same time, this architecture of global economic and financial governance is increasingly at odds with the shape and intensity of interdependence. Hence what is required is flexibility and new solutions using the resources at hand, while preserving the legitimacy of universal rules and institutions which have underpinned the global system for decades. Existing institutions in this respect should be requested to serve collective action beyond the confines of their original remit. Methods need to change as well: many collective action problems can be tackled by cooperation techniques that do not curtail national sovereignty, which actively engage epistemic communities, subnational governments and civil society, or which are based in the voluntary formation of sectoral, regional or development level-based coalitions. Within this broad governance context, the migration governance landscape presents its own unique problems. Migration has historically been regarded as a matter for national decision-making, with the significant exception of the protection of refugees, for which a global regime was defined after World War 2. Nevertheless, increasing cross-border flows as a consequence of economic integration, demographic pressure and climate change have squarely positioned it in the policy space requiring collective action, and highlighted the need for common principles. Migration as a policy issue has become explosively divisive, while migration governance is today a bewilderingly complex and fragmented tapestry of overlapping, parallel, nested and tangential institutions and processes. These depend largely on what aspect of migration is being dealt with, and at what level. Each of the three regimes which can be distinguished (the protection regime, the travel regime, and the labour migration regime) is dealt with differently, at different levels of governance, through instruments and processes with varying levels of constraint. In this context, this high-level policy dialogue attempts to decipher the main elements of the migration governance landscape and address three key issues in the ongoing debate: labour mobility and skills; the Global Compact; and migration governance in the EU. The event is part of the two-year research project on the Transformation of Global Governance (more details at tgg.eui.eu). The Policy Dialogue will bring together a small number of senior policymakers, recognised experts and key participants from industry and civil society. Attendance at the event is by invitation only and takes place under Chatham House rules.


Location:
Sala del Capitolo

Affiliation:
Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies
School of Transnational Governance

Type:
Special Event
 
 

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