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Foundations of Global Justice

Dates:
  • Tue 03 Dec 2019 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-12-03 15:00 2019-12-03 17:00 Europe/Paris Foundations of Global Justice

While global income inequality has been falling, there is still a vast gap between the poorest and richest individuals in the world. Is this inequality morally objectionable? Many believe it is. But on what grounds? Some object to the absolute deprivation suffered by the world’s poorest, which is easily preventable. Others agree, but also believe that the gap between the richest and poorest is morally problematic. For the latter, it is morally relevant that some do better than others; while absolute deprivation matters from a moral point of view, so does relative. This seminar begins by evaluating this further claim as a claim about justice: global inequality is morally objectionable not merely as morally regrettable but as unjust. Topics covered include: Rawls’s justice as fairness, cosmopolitanism, liberal nationalism, state coercion, and reciprocity. The second part of the seminar will turn to a practical and highly salient political question whose resolution turns, in part, on considerations of socioeconomic justice and inequality: immigration. To what extent do states—especially richer states—have a moral permission to exclude foreign citizens who wish to immigrate? Is there any injustice in denying membership? When and why? Does it matter whether would-be immigrants are (relatively) poorer than the citizens and long-term residents of the states to which they want to immigrate? Does it matter whether more open immigration policies promote socioeconomic inequality in receiving countries? Is there a human right to immigration? Topics covered include: immigration as a human right, the role of territory, self-determination, and reciprocity.

Seminar Room 1 DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 1

While global income inequality has been falling, there is still a vast gap between the poorest and richest individuals in the world. Is this inequality morally objectionable? Many believe it is. But on what grounds? Some object to the absolute deprivation suffered by the world’s poorest, which is easily preventable. Others agree, but also believe that the gap between the richest and poorest is morally problematic. For the latter, it is morally relevant that some do better than others; while absolute deprivation matters from a moral point of view, so does relative. This seminar begins by evaluating this further claim as a claim about justice: global inequality is morally objectionable not merely as morally regrettable but as unjust. Topics covered include: Rawls’s justice as fairness, cosmopolitanism, liberal nationalism, state coercion, and reciprocity. The second part of the seminar will turn to a practical and highly salient political question whose resolution turns, in part, on considerations of socioeconomic justice and inequality: immigration. To what extent do states—especially richer states—have a moral permission to exclude foreign citizens who wish to immigrate? Is there any injustice in denying membership? When and why? Does it matter whether would-be immigrants are (relatively) poorer than the citizens and long-term residents of the states to which they want to immigrate? Does it matter whether more open immigration policies promote socioeconomic inequality in receiving countries? Is there a human right to immigration? Topics covered include: immigration as a human right, the role of territory, self-determination, and reciprocity.


Location:
Seminar Room 1

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Seminar

Contact:
Adele Ines Battistini (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Organiser:
Prof. Andrea Sangiovanni (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences)

Attachment:
Syllabus
 
 

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