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Global Knowledge, Emotions, and the Making of Enlightenment Europe: Joseph Stöcklein’s Neuer Welt-Bott Revisited

Dates:
  • Fri 21 Feb 2020 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-02-21 15:00 2020-02-21 17:00 Europe/Paris Global Knowledge, Emotions, and the Making of Enlightenment Europe: Joseph Stöcklein’s Neuer Welt-Bott Revisited

In the framework of the HEC Department Colloquia

Launched by German Jesuit Joseph Stöcklein and published between 1726 and 1761, Der Neue Welt-Bott comprises 812 texts reporting on four continents, maps, and cultural commentary, amounting to 4,500 carefully assembled large-scale folio pages. While the collection was well known in its own day in the European Republic of Letters as a source for natural historical knowledge, it became narrowly classified as missionary letters in modern times after a master narrative of the Enlightenment as a homogeneously secular, anti-Jesuit movement had taken hold. Our talk revisits this influential Jesuit collection in light of more recent scholarship. The emotionally charged, proto-ethnographic stories and materials from all around the globe in the Welt-Bott offer particular insights into the emotional dynamics and local factors that shaped knowledge production in the Enlightenment more broadly. These (g)local and emotional dynamics are usually not, or no longer visible, in the systematic descriptions of nature, culture and religion that Jesuits and other scholars compiled and published in Europe. We posit that emotions were central to knowledge production in the Enlightenment despite - or perhaps even because of - its inherent discourse of rationality. This also enables us to underline the indigenous contributions to European ethnography much better than has hitherto been thought possible. 

Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

In the framework of the HEC Department Colloquia

Launched by German Jesuit Joseph Stöcklein and published between 1726 and 1761, Der Neue Welt-Bott comprises 812 texts reporting on four continents, maps, and cultural commentary, amounting to 4,500 carefully assembled large-scale folio pages. While the collection was well known in its own day in the European Republic of Letters as a source for natural historical knowledge, it became narrowly classified as missionary letters in modern times after a master narrative of the Enlightenment as a homogeneously secular, anti-Jesuit movement had taken hold. Our talk revisits this influential Jesuit collection in light of more recent scholarship. The emotionally charged, proto-ethnographic stories and materials from all around the globe in the Welt-Bott offer particular insights into the emotional dynamics and local factors that shaped knowledge production in the Enlightenment more broadly. These (g)local and emotional dynamics are usually not, or no longer visible, in the systematic descriptions of nature, culture and religion that Jesuits and other scholars compiled and published in Europe. We posit that emotions were central to knowledge production in the Enlightenment despite - or perhaps even because of - its inherent discourse of rationality. This also enables us to underline the indigenous contributions to European ethnography much better than has hitherto been thought possible. 


Location:
Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of History and Civilization

Type:
Lecture

Contact:
Francesca Parenti - Send a mail

Organiser:
Prof. Federico Romero (EUI - HEC)
Giorgio Riello

Speaker:
Ulrike Strasser (University of San Diego)
Renate Dürr (University of Tübingen)

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