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Educating American Modernists - The Origins of the New Haven School

Dates:
  • Mon 16 Sep 2019 14.30 - 16.30
  Add to Calendar 2019-09-16 14:30 2019-09-16 16:30 Europe/Paris Educating American Modernists - The Origins of the New Haven School

This thesis reconstructs an intellectual history of the ‘New Haven School’. It employs archival
material previously unused by researchers, in some cases completely unseen since recording
or storage, to explore what for Lasswell and McDougal were the origins of the ideas that would
become identified in the field of international law as this school. A widespread contemporary
understanding of the New Haven School considers it a post-war response to international
relations realism, a positivist-empiricist theory of international law in an epoch of American
empire. The history recovered in this thesis emphasises the significance of three of strands of
ideas not centrally addressed by this narrative. First, it places Lasswell and McDougal’s ideas
in the cultural context of 1920s and 1930s modernism. Second, the political commitments of
policy-oriented jurisprudence are traced to New Deal redistributionism and European
socialism. Third, two bodies of thought are identified that for Lasswell and McDougal
represented the intellectual origins of New Haven School theory – psychoanalysis and
philosophical pragmatism. The thesis explores this history and these ideas in the following
way. In Chapter 1, the 1968 moment when the New Haven School was named by former
students of Lasswell and McDougal is reconstructed. The thesis then begins to seek the origins
of the ideas that prompted this naming by working backwards through time – in Chapter 2, to
Lasswell and McDougal’s initial 1943 statement of their legal theory, and in Chapters 3 and 4
to the earlier lives of Lasswell and McDougal respectively. In Chapter 5, the thesis concludes
by returning to the post-war period in which the New Haven School was named, exploring the
seminars through which Lasswell and McDougal inspired a group of students to identify as the
New Haven School.

Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

This thesis reconstructs an intellectual history of the ‘New Haven School’. It employs archival
material previously unused by researchers, in some cases completely unseen since recording
or storage, to explore what for Lasswell and McDougal were the origins of the ideas that would
become identified in the field of international law as this school. A widespread contemporary
understanding of the New Haven School considers it a post-war response to international
relations realism, a positivist-empiricist theory of international law in an epoch of American
empire. The history recovered in this thesis emphasises the significance of three of strands of
ideas not centrally addressed by this narrative. First, it places Lasswell and McDougal’s ideas
in the cultural context of 1920s and 1930s modernism. Second, the political commitments of
policy-oriented jurisprudence are traced to New Deal redistributionism and European
socialism. Third, two bodies of thought are identified that for Lasswell and McDougal
represented the intellectual origins of New Haven School theory – psychoanalysis and
philosophical pragmatism. The thesis explores this history and these ideas in the following
way. In Chapter 1, the 1968 moment when the New Haven School was named by former
students of Lasswell and McDougal is reconstructed. The thesis then begins to seek the origins
of the ideas that prompted this naming by working backwards through time – in Chapter 2, to
Lasswell and McDougal’s initial 1943 statement of their legal theory, and in Chapters 3 and 4
to the earlier lives of Lasswell and McDougal respectively. In Chapter 5, the thesis concludes
by returning to the post-war period in which the New Haven School was named, exploring the
seminars through which Lasswell and McDougal inspired a group of students to identify as the
New Haven School.


Location:
Sala del Torrino , Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Thesis defence

Defendant:
Ríán Derrig (EUI)

Supervisor:
Prof. Nehal Bhuta (EUI - Department of Law)

Examiner:
Prof. Martti Koskenniemi (University of Helsinki)
Prof. Claire Kilpatrick (EUI - Law Department)
Prof Samuel Moyn (Yale University)

Contact:
Helene Debuire Franchini - Send a mail
 
 

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