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Does schooling affect social inequality in educational achievement? New evidence from a causal design

Dates:
  • Tue 19 Nov 2019 13.00 - 15.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-11-19 13:00 2019-11-19 15:00 Europe/Paris Does schooling affect social inequality in educational achievement? New evidence from a causal design

Presentation within the Inequality Working Group Does schooling increase or reduce social inequality in learning? What social inequality in achievement would look like had children received less schooling? Answering these questions entails a critical methodological challenge: the construction of the counterfactual out-of-school scenario. Previous sociological studies typically addressed this challenge by comparing social differentials in learning rates when school is in and out of session, that is during the school year and the summer. However, such a design is prone to confounding: Are learning patterns in the summer caused by the absence of schooling or other peculiarities of the summer months? Exploiting the features of both the German education system and the national assessments provided by the NEPS, we propose a causal design where younger age at school start results in a longer exposure to Grade 1 before the assessment. Our results show that increased exposure to the school system increases learning in a variety of competence domains, such as math, science, reading, and vocabulary. However, the effect of schooling on learning is equal among children with a different socio-economic background. Hence, while increasing achievement, schooling does not contribute either to increase or decrease social inequality in learning. These results contribute to a better understanding of the overall role of schooling for social inequality.

Seminar Room 4 - Badia Fiesolana DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room 4 - Badia Fiesolana

Presentation within the Inequality Working Group Does schooling increase or reduce social inequality in learning? What social inequality in achievement would look like had children received less schooling? Answering these questions entails a critical methodological challenge: the construction of the counterfactual out-of-school scenario. Previous sociological studies typically addressed this challenge by comparing social differentials in learning rates when school is in and out of session, that is during the school year and the summer. However, such a design is prone to confounding: Are learning patterns in the summer caused by the absence of schooling or other peculiarities of the summer months? Exploiting the features of both the German education system and the national assessments provided by the NEPS, we propose a causal design where younger age at school start results in a longer exposure to Grade 1 before the assessment. Our results show that increased exposure to the school system increases learning in a variety of competence domains, such as math, science, reading, and vocabulary. However, the effect of schooling on learning is equal among children with a different socio-economic background. Hence, while increasing achievement, schooling does not contribute either to increase or decrease social inequality in learning. These results contribute to a better understanding of the overall role of schooling for social inequality.


Location:
Seminar Room 4 - Badia Fiesolana

Affiliation:
Department of Political and Social Sciences

Type:
Working group

Organiser:
Prof. Juho Härkönen
Prof. Fabrizio Bernardi

Contact:
Monika Rzemieniecka (EUI - Department of Political and Social Sciences) - Send a mail

Speaker:
Research Fellow Giampiero Passaretta

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