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How Easy Is It To Push the Red Button? Dehumanization, Settler Colonialism & Lethal Drones

Dates:
  • Fri 06 Sep 2019 15.00 - 17.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-09-06 15:00 2019-09-06 17:00 Europe/Paris How Easy Is It To Push the Red Button? Dehumanization, Settler Colonialism & Lethal Drones

Virtual reality gaming and military simulators have recently reached new levels of hyper-realism. Simultaneously, unmanned lethal drones have made the experience of using lethal force much more simulator-like, minimizing the gap between killing a video-game-avatar and a real human being. Physically distant and psychologically detached, soldiers now lunch drone strikes from thousands of miles away, with little fear of self-harm or retribution. Powerful countries are now fulfilling the science-fiction fantasy of a risk-free-war, keeping dehumanized targets under complete control and constant surveillance. Is it a dream or humanity’s worst nightmare?
Various narratives and myths have been used to dehumanize the enemy and justify drone strikes, such as the so-called ‘war on terror’ and settler colonial narratives. Considering the harmful consequences of lethal drone strikes, can, and should, the international community act to restrain them? As five permanent Security Council members control the outcome of any suggested resolution, I will suggest an alternative source of inspiration: civil society movements and bottom-up approaches to international law.

About the speaker
Yaar Dagan Peretz is a PhD candidate at Keele University, School of Law and a Visiting Research Scholar at the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, University of Brighton. As part of the Erasmus+ Teaching Mobility Scheme, Yaar has recently taught at the Faculty of Political Science, University of Iceland, in conjunction with the Höfði Reykjavík Peace Centre.
In Keele, Yaar teaches at the School of Law and serves as Peer Liaison and Communications Officer for ‘Under Construction @ Keele’, an interdisciplinary postgraduate journal published by the Research Faculty of Humanities and Social Science. Yaar is also an active member of his Student Union, where he was recently elected as the Executive Officer for Film, Media and Literature, as well as the President for two societies: the Jewish Society and Keele Friends of Palestine.
Before coming to Keele, Yaar served as an editor of the Law Journal of the Emile Zola Chair for Interdisciplinary Human Rights Dialogue and worked as a lecturer at the Academic Center for Law and Science. As a human rights lawyer he petitioned the Supreme Court of Justice on behalf of Palestinians and provided legal aid to refugees, asylum seekers and marginalized communities while volunteering with NGOs such as Arous Elbahar, the Association for Women in Jaffa and ‘Our Colors’ movement

Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati

Virtual reality gaming and military simulators have recently reached new levels of hyper-realism. Simultaneously, unmanned lethal drones have made the experience of using lethal force much more simulator-like, minimizing the gap between killing a video-game-avatar and a real human being. Physically distant and psychologically detached, soldiers now lunch drone strikes from thousands of miles away, with little fear of self-harm or retribution. Powerful countries are now fulfilling the science-fiction fantasy of a risk-free-war, keeping dehumanized targets under complete control and constant surveillance. Is it a dream or humanity’s worst nightmare?
Various narratives and myths have been used to dehumanize the enemy and justify drone strikes, such as the so-called ‘war on terror’ and settler colonial narratives. Considering the harmful consequences of lethal drone strikes, can, and should, the international community act to restrain them? As five permanent Security Council members control the outcome of any suggested resolution, I will suggest an alternative source of inspiration: civil society movements and bottom-up approaches to international law.

About the speaker
Yaar Dagan Peretz is a PhD candidate at Keele University, School of Law and a Visiting Research Scholar at the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, University of Brighton. As part of the Erasmus+ Teaching Mobility Scheme, Yaar has recently taught at the Faculty of Political Science, University of Iceland, in conjunction with the Höfði Reykjavík Peace Centre.
In Keele, Yaar teaches at the School of Law and serves as Peer Liaison and Communications Officer for ‘Under Construction @ Keele’, an interdisciplinary postgraduate journal published by the Research Faculty of Humanities and Social Science. Yaar is also an active member of his Student Union, where he was recently elected as the Executive Officer for Film, Media and Literature, as well as the President for two societies: the Jewish Society and Keele Friends of Palestine.
Before coming to Keele, Yaar served as an editor of the Law Journal of the Emile Zola Chair for Interdisciplinary Human Rights Dialogue and worked as a lecturer at the Academic Center for Law and Science. As a human rights lawyer he petitioned the Supreme Court of Justice on behalf of Palestinians and provided legal aid to refugees, asylum seekers and marginalized communities while volunteering with NGOs such as Arous Elbahar, the Association for Women in Jaffa and ‘Our Colors’ movement


Location:
Sala dei Levrieri, Villa Salviati

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Working group

Contact:
Valentina Spiga - Send a mail

Organiser:
INFOSOC Working Group
 
 

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