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Durable by Design? Policy Feedback In a Changing Climate

Dates:
  • Mon 18 Nov 2019 16.30 - 18.00
  Add to Calendar 2019-11-18 16:30 2019-11-18 18:00 Europe/Paris Durable by Design? Policy Feedback In a Changing Climate

Following the landmark Paris Agreement, policy makers are under mounting political pressure to design more durable climate policies that rapidly deliver deep, society-wide decarbonisation. But while the political rationale for adopting such policies is regularly articulated, far less is known about if and how they emerge in the real world and thus what differentiates them from fragile policies that are amended at the first sign of political opposition. In his talk, Prof Jordan will provide an analysis of the determinants of policy durability in three high-profile areas - biofuel production, car transport and industrial greenhouse gas emissions – drawing on the findings of a new book to be published by CUP in 2020. The book breaks new ground by going beyond the adoption of key European Union (EU) climate policies, to study the policy feedbacks they have triggered over time. This new approach creates a fuller understanding of how these policies have shaped both their own durability and, crucially, their ability to stimulate supportive political dynamics in society. Prof Jordan will link policy theories with new empirical evidence to explore how and why designers in the EU set about packaging together different elements of policy – including broad long term goals and increasingly complex policy instruments. He reveals that the most durable and effective policies have incorporated a subtle mix of design features that lock certain aspects into place but provide sufficient flexibility to prevent policy drift and redundancy. In making fresh theoretical and conceptual linkages between the debates on policy durability, policy feedback and policy design, he attempts to open up a rich new agenda for both academic researchers and policy makers.

Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle DD/MM/YYYY
  Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

Following the landmark Paris Agreement, policy makers are under mounting political pressure to design more durable climate policies that rapidly deliver deep, society-wide decarbonisation. But while the political rationale for adopting such policies is regularly articulated, far less is known about if and how they emerge in the real world and thus what differentiates them from fragile policies that are amended at the first sign of political opposition. In his talk, Prof Jordan will provide an analysis of the determinants of policy durability in three high-profile areas - biofuel production, car transport and industrial greenhouse gas emissions – drawing on the findings of a new book to be published by CUP in 2020. The book breaks new ground by going beyond the adoption of key European Union (EU) climate policies, to study the policy feedbacks they have triggered over time. This new approach creates a fuller understanding of how these policies have shaped both their own durability and, crucially, their ability to stimulate supportive political dynamics in society. Prof Jordan will link policy theories with new empirical evidence to explore how and why designers in the EU set about packaging together different elements of policy – including broad long term goals and increasingly complex policy instruments. He reveals that the most durable and effective policies have incorporated a subtle mix of design features that lock certain aspects into place but provide sufficient flexibility to prevent policy drift and redundancy. In making fresh theoretical and conceptual linkages between the debates on policy durability, policy feedback and policy design, he attempts to open up a rich new agenda for both academic researchers and policy makers.


Location:
Sala del Torrino - Villa Salviati- Castle

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Lecture

Organiser:
Prof. Joanne Scott (EUI - Law Department)

Speaker:
Prof. Andrew Jordan (University of East Anglia)

Contact:
Helene Debuire Franchini - Send a mail
 

Page last updated on 18 August 2017