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An Introduction to Law and Decolonisation

Dates:
  • Fri 27 Mar 2020 11.30 - 13.00
  Add to Calendar 2020-03-27 11:30 2020-03-27 13:00 Europe/Paris An Introduction to Law and Decolonisation

Perched high in the hills of Fiesole, we might find ourselves immersed in discussions about global inequality, cultural differences, political priorities and legal definitions. But how much does our place of enunciation matter in these debates and in the research we do? While in the fields of legal theory and European legal scholarship the curriculum has remained predominantly (and often unconsciously) white and male, in the field of socio-legal scholarship, questions about situated knowledge and ‘epistemologies from the South’ have gained importance in later decades. Scholars have increasingly emphasized ‘decolonisation’ in order to confront the history of imperialism and its effects upon the study and practice of law. But how do we acknowledge the ways in which colonial history and legacy has influenced how law is taught, what law is taught, what law is now, and who law serves? And while ‘decolonisation’ has experienced a surge in interest, discussions about the meaning of the concept are alive with confusion and ambiguity. In this course, we will explore how the nexus between law and society can be understood from the perspectives of those marginalized by the colonial experience, while questioning at the same time if we are even able to undertake such a project - and what the limits to such a project may be.

Seminar Room Mansarda - Villa Schifanoia DD/MM/YYYY
  Seminar Room Mansarda - Villa Schifanoia

Perched high in the hills of Fiesole, we might find ourselves immersed in discussions about global inequality, cultural differences, political priorities and legal definitions. But how much does our place of enunciation matter in these debates and in the research we do? While in the fields of legal theory and European legal scholarship the curriculum has remained predominantly (and often unconsciously) white and male, in the field of socio-legal scholarship, questions about situated knowledge and ‘epistemologies from the South’ have gained importance in later decades. Scholars have increasingly emphasized ‘decolonisation’ in order to confront the history of imperialism and its effects upon the study and practice of law. But how do we acknowledge the ways in which colonial history and legacy has influenced how law is taught, what law is taught, what law is now, and who law serves? And while ‘decolonisation’ has experienced a surge in interest, discussions about the meaning of the concept are alive with confusion and ambiguity. In this course, we will explore how the nexus between law and society can be understood from the perspectives of those marginalized by the colonial experience, while questioning at the same time if we are even able to undertake such a project - and what the limits to such a project may be.


Location:
Seminar Room Mansarda - Villa Schifanoia

Affiliation:
Department of Law

Type:
Course

Contact:
Julie Wetterslev (EUI - Law Department) - Send a mail
Arpitha Upendra Kodiveri (EUI - Law Department) - Send a mail

Speaker:
Julie Wetterslev (EUI - Law Department)
Arpitha Upendra Kodiveri (EUI - Law Department)

Attachment:
Course Syllabus

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